How does chemotherapy cure? Exploring and exploiting the immune system to transform the tumor microenvironment and improve chemotherapy efficacy

Caitlin Tilsed

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

226 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Chemotherapy is the first line treatment for many cancers; however, it is rarely curative. Despite wide clinical use, it is unclear what distinguishes responders from non-responders and the factors that drive a robust anti-cancer response. This has hindered the identification of predictive biomarkers that can guide clinical decision making as well as the development of new combination treatment strategies. Here, we characterised the tumor microenvironment associated with a complete response to cyclophosphamide chemotherapy; demonstrated that tumors can be sensitised to chemotherapy by inducing a chemo-sensitive phenotype; and investigated the relationship between cyclophosphamide effectiveness and T regulatory cells.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Lesterhuis, Willem, Supervisor
  • Fisher, Scott, Supervisor
  • Lake, Richard, Supervisor
  • Nowak, Anna, Supervisor
Thesis sponsors
Award date11 Nov 2021
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2021

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'How does chemotherapy cure? Exploring and exploiting the immune system to transform the tumor microenvironment and improve chemotherapy efficacy'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this