How are we performing?: A retrospective review of the management of peristomal pyoderma gangrenosum in a tertiary institution against current practice: A case series of inflammatory bowel disease patients

Daniel Lightowler, Gordon Christopher, McLaughlin Marlene, Erika Lopez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

First described in 1930 by Brunsting, pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a neutrophilic dermatosis which can be described as a chronic and recurrent condition with painful cutaneous ulcerations. Peristomal pyoderma gangrenosum (PPG) is an uncommon subtype of this dermatosis, which occurs around a stoma site and is often seen in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. PPG has also been observed in patients with various other conditions such as diverticular disease and also colonic cancer. PPG is often challenging to diagnose and manage and is frequently refractory to many treatments. A broad range of therapies is currently utilised to treat this complex dermatosis, including topical and systemic medications, surgical intervention and intensive wound therapy. PPG can cause many complications to patients and their stomas, as bags do not adhere appropriately due to the ulceration and the topical treatments themselves. Leakage of stoma contents is common and further skin breakdown is often noted; this, in turn, causes further inflammation. A specialist, multidisciplinary approach between dermatology, stomal therapy, colorectal surgery, gastroenterology and infectious diseases has been highlighted within many studies as the most effective approach to manage this complex condition.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)8-12
JournalThe Journal of Stomal Therapy Australia
Volume37
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'How are we performing?: A retrospective review of the management of peristomal pyoderma gangrenosum in a tertiary institution against current practice: A case series of inflammatory bowel disease patients'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this