Hospital collaboration with a Housing First program to improve health outcomes for people experiencing homelessness

Lisa Wood, Nicholas Wood, Shannen Vallesi, Amanda Stafford, Andrew Davies, Craig Cumming

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Homelessness is a colossal issue, precipitated by a wide array of social determinants, and mirrored in substantial health disparities and a revolving hospital door. Connecting people to safe and secure housing needs to be part of the health system response. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach: This mixed-methods paper presents emerging findings from the collaboration between an inner city hospital, a specialist homeless medicine GP service and Western Australia’s inaugural Housing First collective impact project (50 Lives 50 Homes) in Perth. This paper draws on data from hospitals, homelessness community services and general practice. Findings: This collaboration has facilitated hospital identification and referral of vulnerable rough sleepers to the Housing First project, and connected those housed to a GP and after hours nursing support. For a cohort (n=44) housed now for at least 12 months, significant reductions in hospital use and associated costs were observed. Research limitations/implications: While the observed reductions in hospital use in the year following housing are based on a small cohort, this data and the case studies presented demonstrate the power of care coordinated across hospital and community in this complex cohort. Practical implications: This model of collaboration between a hospital and a Housing First project can not only improve discharge outcomes and re-admission in the shorter term, but can also contribute to ending homelessness which is itself, a social determinant of poor health. Originality/value: Coordinated care between hospitals and programmes to house people who are homeless can significantly reduce hospital use and healthcare costs, and provides hospitals with the opportunity to contribute to more systemic solutions to ending homelessness. © 2018, Emerald Publishing Limited.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)27-39
Number of pages13
JournalHousing, Care and Support
Volume22
Issue number1
Early online date18 Jan 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Mar 2019

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homelessness
housing
health
hospital
programme
determinants
emerald
community service
costs
cost
medicine
health care
nursing

Cite this

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abstract = "Purpose: Homelessness is a colossal issue, precipitated by a wide array of social determinants, and mirrored in substantial health disparities and a revolving hospital door. Connecting people to safe and secure housing needs to be part of the health system response. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach: This mixed-methods paper presents emerging findings from the collaboration between an inner city hospital, a specialist homeless medicine GP service and Western Australia’s inaugural Housing First collective impact project (50 Lives 50 Homes) in Perth. This paper draws on data from hospitals, homelessness community services and general practice. Findings: This collaboration has facilitated hospital identification and referral of vulnerable rough sleepers to the Housing First project, and connected those housed to a GP and after hours nursing support. For a cohort (n=44) housed now for at least 12 months, significant reductions in hospital use and associated costs were observed. Research limitations/implications: While the observed reductions in hospital use in the year following housing are based on a small cohort, this data and the case studies presented demonstrate the power of care coordinated across hospital and community in this complex cohort. Practical implications: This model of collaboration between a hospital and a Housing First project can not only improve discharge outcomes and re-admission in the shorter term, but can also contribute to ending homelessness which is itself, a social determinant of poor health. Originality/value: Coordinated care between hospitals and programmes to house people who are homeless can significantly reduce hospital use and healthcare costs, and provides hospitals with the opportunity to contribute to more systemic solutions to ending homelessness. {\circledC} 2018, Emerald Publishing Limited.",
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Hospital collaboration with a Housing First program to improve health outcomes for people experiencing homelessness. / Wood, Lisa; Wood, Nicholas; Vallesi, Shannen; Stafford, Amanda; Davies, Andrew; Cumming, Craig.

In: Housing, Care and Support, Vol. 22, No. 1, 18.03.2019, p. 27-39.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hospital collaboration with a Housing First program to improve health outcomes for people experiencing homelessness

AU - Wood, Lisa

AU - Wood, Nicholas

AU - Vallesi, Shannen

AU - Stafford, Amanda

AU - Davies, Andrew

AU - Cumming, Craig

PY - 2019/3/18

Y1 - 2019/3/18

N2 - Purpose: Homelessness is a colossal issue, precipitated by a wide array of social determinants, and mirrored in substantial health disparities and a revolving hospital door. Connecting people to safe and secure housing needs to be part of the health system response. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach: This mixed-methods paper presents emerging findings from the collaboration between an inner city hospital, a specialist homeless medicine GP service and Western Australia’s inaugural Housing First collective impact project (50 Lives 50 Homes) in Perth. This paper draws on data from hospitals, homelessness community services and general practice. Findings: This collaboration has facilitated hospital identification and referral of vulnerable rough sleepers to the Housing First project, and connected those housed to a GP and after hours nursing support. For a cohort (n=44) housed now for at least 12 months, significant reductions in hospital use and associated costs were observed. Research limitations/implications: While the observed reductions in hospital use in the year following housing are based on a small cohort, this data and the case studies presented demonstrate the power of care coordinated across hospital and community in this complex cohort. Practical implications: This model of collaboration between a hospital and a Housing First project can not only improve discharge outcomes and re-admission in the shorter term, but can also contribute to ending homelessness which is itself, a social determinant of poor health. Originality/value: Coordinated care between hospitals and programmes to house people who are homeless can significantly reduce hospital use and healthcare costs, and provides hospitals with the opportunity to contribute to more systemic solutions to ending homelessness. © 2018, Emerald Publishing Limited.

AB - Purpose: Homelessness is a colossal issue, precipitated by a wide array of social determinants, and mirrored in substantial health disparities and a revolving hospital door. Connecting people to safe and secure housing needs to be part of the health system response. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach: This mixed-methods paper presents emerging findings from the collaboration between an inner city hospital, a specialist homeless medicine GP service and Western Australia’s inaugural Housing First collective impact project (50 Lives 50 Homes) in Perth. This paper draws on data from hospitals, homelessness community services and general practice. Findings: This collaboration has facilitated hospital identification and referral of vulnerable rough sleepers to the Housing First project, and connected those housed to a GP and after hours nursing support. For a cohort (n=44) housed now for at least 12 months, significant reductions in hospital use and associated costs were observed. Research limitations/implications: While the observed reductions in hospital use in the year following housing are based on a small cohort, this data and the case studies presented demonstrate the power of care coordinated across hospital and community in this complex cohort. Practical implications: This model of collaboration between a hospital and a Housing First project can not only improve discharge outcomes and re-admission in the shorter term, but can also contribute to ending homelessness which is itself, a social determinant of poor health. Originality/value: Coordinated care between hospitals and programmes to house people who are homeless can significantly reduce hospital use and healthcare costs, and provides hospitals with the opportunity to contribute to more systemic solutions to ending homelessness. © 2018, Emerald Publishing Limited.

KW - Social determinants of health

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JO - Housing, Care and Support

JF - Housing, Care and Support

SN - 1460-8790

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ER -