Hospital admissions in children with developmental disabilities from ethnic minority backgrounds

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Abstract

Aim: To compare hospital admission patterns after the first year of life in Australian children with developmental disabilities and children with no known disability, according to maternal country of birth and Indigenous status. Method: This was a retrospective cohort study using linked data across health, disability, and hospital admission databases. The study investigated 656 174 children born in Western Australia between 1983 and 2008 with a total of 1 091 834 records of hospital admissions. Results: Children with no known disability born to Indigenous mothers had the highest rate of hospital admissions compared to children of non-Indigenous mothers. Children of foreign-born mothers from low-income countries had the highest rate of hospital admissions if disability was present. Children with cerebral palsy (CP) with or without associated intellectual disability had the highest rate of hospital admissions among children with developmental disability, especially if mothers were foreign-born. Interpretation: Children with CP and intellectual disability, particularly from minority backgrounds (Indigenous Australian and foreign-born mothers), were at higher risk of being admitted to hospital after the first year of life. What this paper adds: Hospital admissions in Australian children with and without disabilities differ according to maternal country of birth. Hospital admission rates in children without a developmental disability were greatest for Australian-born Indigenous children. Disabled Australian-born children of foreign-born mothers from low-income countries had the highest hospital admission rates. Hospital admission risk was greatest for Australian-born children with cerebral palsy, especially if mothers were foreign-born.

Original languageEnglish
JournalDevelopmental Medicine and Child Neurology
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 9 Sep 2019

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Developmental Disabilities
Disabled Children
Mothers
Cerebral Palsy
Intellectual Disability
Parturition
Western Australia
Hospital Records
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Databases

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title = "Hospital admissions in children with developmental disabilities from ethnic minority backgrounds",
abstract = "Aim: To compare hospital admission patterns after the first year of life in Australian children with developmental disabilities and children with no known disability, according to maternal country of birth and Indigenous status. Method: This was a retrospective cohort study using linked data across health, disability, and hospital admission databases. The study investigated 656 174 children born in Western Australia between 1983 and 2008 with a total of 1 091 834 records of hospital admissions. Results: Children with no known disability born to Indigenous mothers had the highest rate of hospital admissions compared to children of non-Indigenous mothers. Children of foreign-born mothers from low-income countries had the highest rate of hospital admissions if disability was present. Children with cerebral palsy (CP) with or without associated intellectual disability had the highest rate of hospital admissions among children with developmental disability, especially if mothers were foreign-born. Interpretation: Children with CP and intellectual disability, particularly from minority backgrounds (Indigenous Australian and foreign-born mothers), were at higher risk of being admitted to hospital after the first year of life. What this paper adds: Hospital admissions in Australian children with and without disabilities differ according to maternal country of birth. Hospital admission rates in children without a developmental disability were greatest for Australian-born Indigenous children. Disabled Australian-born children of foreign-born mothers from low-income countries had the highest hospital admission rates. Hospital admission risk was greatest for Australian-born children with cerebral palsy, especially if mothers were foreign-born.",
author = "Ifrah Abdullahi and Kingsley Wong and {de Klerk}, Nicholas and Raewyn Mutch and Glasson, {Emma J.} and Jenny Downs and Sarah Cherian and Helen Leonard",
year = "2019",
month = "9",
day = "9",
doi = "10.1111/dmcn.14348",
language = "English",
journal = "Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology",
issn = "0012-1622",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

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T1 - Hospital admissions in children with developmental disabilities from ethnic minority backgrounds

AU - Abdullahi, Ifrah

AU - Wong, Kingsley

AU - de Klerk, Nicholas

AU - Mutch, Raewyn

AU - Glasson, Emma J.

AU - Downs, Jenny

AU - Cherian, Sarah

AU - Leonard, Helen

PY - 2019/9/9

Y1 - 2019/9/9

N2 - Aim: To compare hospital admission patterns after the first year of life in Australian children with developmental disabilities and children with no known disability, according to maternal country of birth and Indigenous status. Method: This was a retrospective cohort study using linked data across health, disability, and hospital admission databases. The study investigated 656 174 children born in Western Australia between 1983 and 2008 with a total of 1 091 834 records of hospital admissions. Results: Children with no known disability born to Indigenous mothers had the highest rate of hospital admissions compared to children of non-Indigenous mothers. Children of foreign-born mothers from low-income countries had the highest rate of hospital admissions if disability was present. Children with cerebral palsy (CP) with or without associated intellectual disability had the highest rate of hospital admissions among children with developmental disability, especially if mothers were foreign-born. Interpretation: Children with CP and intellectual disability, particularly from minority backgrounds (Indigenous Australian and foreign-born mothers), were at higher risk of being admitted to hospital after the first year of life. What this paper adds: Hospital admissions in Australian children with and without disabilities differ according to maternal country of birth. Hospital admission rates in children without a developmental disability were greatest for Australian-born Indigenous children. Disabled Australian-born children of foreign-born mothers from low-income countries had the highest hospital admission rates. Hospital admission risk was greatest for Australian-born children with cerebral palsy, especially if mothers were foreign-born.

AB - Aim: To compare hospital admission patterns after the first year of life in Australian children with developmental disabilities and children with no known disability, according to maternal country of birth and Indigenous status. Method: This was a retrospective cohort study using linked data across health, disability, and hospital admission databases. The study investigated 656 174 children born in Western Australia between 1983 and 2008 with a total of 1 091 834 records of hospital admissions. Results: Children with no known disability born to Indigenous mothers had the highest rate of hospital admissions compared to children of non-Indigenous mothers. Children of foreign-born mothers from low-income countries had the highest rate of hospital admissions if disability was present. Children with cerebral palsy (CP) with or without associated intellectual disability had the highest rate of hospital admissions among children with developmental disability, especially if mothers were foreign-born. Interpretation: Children with CP and intellectual disability, particularly from minority backgrounds (Indigenous Australian and foreign-born mothers), were at higher risk of being admitted to hospital after the first year of life. What this paper adds: Hospital admissions in Australian children with and without disabilities differ according to maternal country of birth. Hospital admission rates in children without a developmental disability were greatest for Australian-born Indigenous children. Disabled Australian-born children of foreign-born mothers from low-income countries had the highest hospital admission rates. Hospital admission risk was greatest for Australian-born children with cerebral palsy, especially if mothers were foreign-born.

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