Hormone Replacement Therapy and Mammographic Screening Outcomes in Western Australia

K. Crouchley, Liz Wylie, E. Khong

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    6 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objectives The study objectives were three-fold: to estimate the effect of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use on the sensitivity of mammographic screening; to examine the odds of having an interval cancer as a function of duration of HRT use and to compare the size, grade, lymph node and hormone receptor status of tumours for HRT users and non-users.Setting Perth, Western Australia, where a free, population-based mammographic screening service targets women aged 50-69 years.Methods The cohort consisted of 113,3 10 women who had 119,296 screening episodes between January 1998 and December 1999. Unconditional logistic regression was used to model the odds of having an interval cancer as a function of the effect of the duration of HRT use (measured in years). Using subsequent screening rounds, chi(2) tests were used to examine whether HRT users differed from HRT non-users in terms of tumour characteristics.Results Ninety-seven screen-detected and 31 interval cancers were diagnosed among women who were on initial screening rounds, and 393 screen-detected and 153 interval cancers were diagnosed among women on subsequent screens, two years post screening. Two-year sensitivity outcomes were significantly lower for HRT users on initial screening rounds. For women on subsequent screening rounds, the odds of having an interval cancer increased with the duration of HRT use (odds ratio 1.09 95% confidence interval 1.04-1.14, P<0.04) after controlling for age, family history, tumour grade, size and pathology type. The histopathological characteristics of cancers did not differ for HRT users compared with HRT non-users.Conclusion The sensitivity of mammographic screening was reduced and the odds of having an interval cancer were increased for HRT users compared with HRT non-users. For women on subsequent screening episodes, the odds of having an interval cancer increased with duration of HRT use.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)93-97
    JournalJournal of Medical Screening
    Volume13
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2006

    Fingerprint

    Western Australia
    Hormone Replacement Therapy
    Neoplasms

    Cite this

    @article{3d8295be953840e7ba69c9391b7d4253,
    title = "Hormone Replacement Therapy and Mammographic Screening Outcomes in Western Australia",
    abstract = "Objectives The study objectives were three-fold: to estimate the effect of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use on the sensitivity of mammographic screening; to examine the odds of having an interval cancer as a function of duration of HRT use and to compare the size, grade, lymph node and hormone receptor status of tumours for HRT users and non-users.Setting Perth, Western Australia, where a free, population-based mammographic screening service targets women aged 50-69 years.Methods The cohort consisted of 113,3 10 women who had 119,296 screening episodes between January 1998 and December 1999. Unconditional logistic regression was used to model the odds of having an interval cancer as a function of the effect of the duration of HRT use (measured in years). Using subsequent screening rounds, chi(2) tests were used to examine whether HRT users differed from HRT non-users in terms of tumour characteristics.Results Ninety-seven screen-detected and 31 interval cancers were diagnosed among women who were on initial screening rounds, and 393 screen-detected and 153 interval cancers were diagnosed among women on subsequent screens, two years post screening. Two-year sensitivity outcomes were significantly lower for HRT users on initial screening rounds. For women on subsequent screening rounds, the odds of having an interval cancer increased with the duration of HRT use (odds ratio 1.09 95{\%} confidence interval 1.04-1.14, P<0.04) after controlling for age, family history, tumour grade, size and pathology type. The histopathological characteristics of cancers did not differ for HRT users compared with HRT non-users.Conclusion The sensitivity of mammographic screening was reduced and the odds of having an interval cancer were increased for HRT users compared with HRT non-users. For women on subsequent screening episodes, the odds of having an interval cancer increased with duration of HRT use.",
    author = "K. Crouchley and Liz Wylie and E. Khong",
    year = "2006",
    doi = "10.1258/096914106777589588",
    language = "English",
    volume = "13",
    pages = "93--97",
    journal = "Journal of Medical Screening",
    issn = "0969-1413",
    publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",

    }

    Hormone Replacement Therapy and Mammographic Screening Outcomes in Western Australia. / Crouchley, K.; Wylie, Liz; Khong, E.

    In: Journal of Medical Screening, Vol. 13, 2006, p. 93-97.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Hormone Replacement Therapy and Mammographic Screening Outcomes in Western Australia

    AU - Crouchley, K.

    AU - Wylie, Liz

    AU - Khong, E.

    PY - 2006

    Y1 - 2006

    N2 - Objectives The study objectives were three-fold: to estimate the effect of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use on the sensitivity of mammographic screening; to examine the odds of having an interval cancer as a function of duration of HRT use and to compare the size, grade, lymph node and hormone receptor status of tumours for HRT users and non-users.Setting Perth, Western Australia, where a free, population-based mammographic screening service targets women aged 50-69 years.Methods The cohort consisted of 113,3 10 women who had 119,296 screening episodes between January 1998 and December 1999. Unconditional logistic regression was used to model the odds of having an interval cancer as a function of the effect of the duration of HRT use (measured in years). Using subsequent screening rounds, chi(2) tests were used to examine whether HRT users differed from HRT non-users in terms of tumour characteristics.Results Ninety-seven screen-detected and 31 interval cancers were diagnosed among women who were on initial screening rounds, and 393 screen-detected and 153 interval cancers were diagnosed among women on subsequent screens, two years post screening. Two-year sensitivity outcomes were significantly lower for HRT users on initial screening rounds. For women on subsequent screening rounds, the odds of having an interval cancer increased with the duration of HRT use (odds ratio 1.09 95% confidence interval 1.04-1.14, P<0.04) after controlling for age, family history, tumour grade, size and pathology type. The histopathological characteristics of cancers did not differ for HRT users compared with HRT non-users.Conclusion The sensitivity of mammographic screening was reduced and the odds of having an interval cancer were increased for HRT users compared with HRT non-users. For women on subsequent screening episodes, the odds of having an interval cancer increased with duration of HRT use.

    AB - Objectives The study objectives were three-fold: to estimate the effect of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use on the sensitivity of mammographic screening; to examine the odds of having an interval cancer as a function of duration of HRT use and to compare the size, grade, lymph node and hormone receptor status of tumours for HRT users and non-users.Setting Perth, Western Australia, where a free, population-based mammographic screening service targets women aged 50-69 years.Methods The cohort consisted of 113,3 10 women who had 119,296 screening episodes between January 1998 and December 1999. Unconditional logistic regression was used to model the odds of having an interval cancer as a function of the effect of the duration of HRT use (measured in years). Using subsequent screening rounds, chi(2) tests were used to examine whether HRT users differed from HRT non-users in terms of tumour characteristics.Results Ninety-seven screen-detected and 31 interval cancers were diagnosed among women who were on initial screening rounds, and 393 screen-detected and 153 interval cancers were diagnosed among women on subsequent screens, two years post screening. Two-year sensitivity outcomes were significantly lower for HRT users on initial screening rounds. For women on subsequent screening rounds, the odds of having an interval cancer increased with the duration of HRT use (odds ratio 1.09 95% confidence interval 1.04-1.14, P<0.04) after controlling for age, family history, tumour grade, size and pathology type. The histopathological characteristics of cancers did not differ for HRT users compared with HRT non-users.Conclusion The sensitivity of mammographic screening was reduced and the odds of having an interval cancer were increased for HRT users compared with HRT non-users. For women on subsequent screening episodes, the odds of having an interval cancer increased with duration of HRT use.

    U2 - 10.1258/096914106777589588

    DO - 10.1258/096914106777589588

    M3 - Article

    VL - 13

    SP - 93

    EP - 97

    JO - Journal of Medical Screening

    JF - Journal of Medical Screening

    SN - 0969-1413

    ER -