Histo-blood group antigen profile of Australian Aboriginal children and seropositivity following oral rotavirus vaccination

Bianca F. Middleton, Margie Danchin, Nigel A. Cunliffe, Mark A. Jones, Karen Boniface, Carl D. Kirkwood, Sarah Gallagher, Lea Ann Kirkham, Caitlyn Granland, Monica McNeal, Celeste Donato, Nada Bogdanovic-Sakran, Amanda Handley, Julie E. Bines, Thomas L. Snelling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) may influence immune responses to rotavirus vaccination. Methods: HBGA phenotyping was determined by detection of antigens A, B, H and Lewis a and b in saliva using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Secretor status was confirmed by lectin antigen assay if A, B and H antigens were negative or borderline (OD ± 0.1 of threshold of detection). PCR-RFLP analysis was used to identify the FUT2 ‘G428A’ mutation in a subset. Rotavirus seropositivity was defined as serum anti-rotavirus IgA ≥ 20 AU/mL. Results: Of 156 children, 119 (76 %) were secretors, 129 (83 %) were Lewis antigen positive, and 105 (67 %) were rotavirus IgA seropositive. Eighty-seven of 119 (73 %) secretors were rotavirus seropositive, versus 4/9 (44 %) weak secretors and 13/27 (48 %) non-secretors. Conclusions: Most Australian Aboriginal children were secretor and Lewis antigen positive. Non-secretor children were less likely to be seropositive to rotavirus antibodies following vaccination, but this phenotype was less common. HBGA status is unlikely to fully explain underperformance of rotavirus vaccines among Australian Aboriginal children.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3579-3583
Number of pages5
JournalVaccine
Volume41
Issue number24
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2023

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