Higher heart rate increases risk of diabetes among men: The Australian Diabetes Obesity and Lifestyle (AusDiab) study

N. M. Grantham, D. J. Magliano, Stephanie K. Tanamas, S. Söderberg, M. P. Schlaich, J. E. Shaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims A very limited number of prospective studies have reported conflicting data on the relation between heart rate and diabetes risk. Our aim therefore was to determine in a large, national, population-based cohort if heart rate predicts the development of diabetes. Methods The Australian Diabetes Obesity and Lifestyle study followed up 6537 people over 5 years. Baseline measurements included questionnaires, anthropometrics and blood and urine collection. Heart rate was recorded in beats per min (Dinamap). An oral glucose tolerance test was performed at baseline and follow-up, and diabetes was defined using World Health Organization criteria. Results A total of 5817 participants were eligible for analysis, 221 of whom developed diabetes. Compared with participants with a heart rate < 60 b min–1, those with a heart rate ≥ 80 b min–1 were more likely to develop diabetes (odds ratio 1.89, 95% CI 1.07–3.35) over 5 years, independent of traditional risk factors. This relationship was highly significant, particularly in non-obese men (odds ratio 5.61, 95% CI 1.75–17.98), but not in their obese counterparts or in women. Conclusions Resting heart rate is associated with an increased risk of diabetes over a 5-year period, particularly among non-obese men. This suggests that sympathetic overactivity may be a contributing factor to the development of diabetes, and that resting heart rate may be useful in predicting risk of Type 2 diabetes in non-obese men.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)421-427
Number of pages7
JournalDiabetic Medicine
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Life Style
Obesity
Heart Rate
Odds Ratio
Urine Specimen Collection
Glucose Tolerance Test
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Prospective Studies
Population

Cite this

Grantham, N. M. ; Magliano, D. J. ; Tanamas, Stephanie K. ; Söderberg, S. ; Schlaich, M. P. ; Shaw, J. E. / Higher heart rate increases risk of diabetes among men : The Australian Diabetes Obesity and Lifestyle (AusDiab) study. In: Diabetic Medicine. 2013 ; Vol. 30, No. 4. pp. 421-427.
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abstract = "Aims A very limited number of prospective studies have reported conflicting data on the relation between heart rate and diabetes risk. Our aim therefore was to determine in a large, national, population-based cohort if heart rate predicts the development of diabetes. Methods The Australian Diabetes Obesity and Lifestyle study followed up 6537 people over 5 years. Baseline measurements included questionnaires, anthropometrics and blood and urine collection. Heart rate was recorded in beats per min (Dinamap). An oral glucose tolerance test was performed at baseline and follow-up, and diabetes was defined using World Health Organization criteria. Results A total of 5817 participants were eligible for analysis, 221 of whom developed diabetes. Compared with participants with a heart rate < 60 b min–1, those with a heart rate ≥ 80 b min–1 were more likely to develop diabetes (odds ratio 1.89, 95{\%} CI 1.07–3.35) over 5 years, independent of traditional risk factors. This relationship was highly significant, particularly in non-obese men (odds ratio 5.61, 95{\%} CI 1.75–17.98), but not in their obese counterparts or in women. Conclusions Resting heart rate is associated with an increased risk of diabetes over a 5-year period, particularly among non-obese men. This suggests that sympathetic overactivity may be a contributing factor to the development of diabetes, and that resting heart rate may be useful in predicting risk of Type 2 diabetes in non-obese men.",
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Higher heart rate increases risk of diabetes among men : The Australian Diabetes Obesity and Lifestyle (AusDiab) study. / Grantham, N. M.; Magliano, D. J.; Tanamas, Stephanie K.; Söderberg, S.; Schlaich, M. P.; Shaw, J. E.

In: Diabetic Medicine, Vol. 30, No. 4, 04.2013, p. 421-427.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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