High Dose Vitamin D supplementation alters faecal microbiome and predisposes mice to more severe colitis

Simon Ghaly, Nadeem O. Kaakoush, Frances Lloyd, Terence McGonigle, Danny Mok, Angela Baird, Borut Klopcic, Lavinia Gordon, Shelley Gorman, Cynthia Forest, Roger Bouillon, Ian C. Lawrance, Prue H. Hart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Vitamin D has been suggested as a possible adjunctive treatment to ameliorate disease severity in human inflammatory bowel disease. In this study, the effects of diets containing high (D++, 10,000 IU/kg), moderate (D+, 2,280 IU/kg) or no vitamin D (D−) on the severity of dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) colitis in female C57Bl/6 mice were investigated. The group on high dose vitamin D (D++) developed the most severe colitis as measured by blinded endoscopic (p < 0.001) and histologic (p < 0.05) assessment, weight loss (p < 0.001), drop in serum albumin (p = 0.05) and increased expression of colonic TNF-α (p < 0.05). Microbiota analysis of faecal DNA showed that the microbial composition of D++ control mice was more similar to that of DSS mice. Serum 25(OH)D3 levels reduced by 63% in the D++ group and 23% in the D+ group after 6 days of DSS treatment. Thus, high dose vitamin D supplementation is associated with a shift to a more inflammatory faecal microbiome and increased susceptibility to colitis, with a fall in circulating vitamin D occurring as a secondary event in response to the inflammatory process.

Original languageEnglish
Article number11511
JournalScientific Reports
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2018

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Microbiota
Colitis
Vitamin D
Dextran Sulfate
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Serum Albumin
Weight Loss
Diet
DNA
Serum

Cite this

Ghaly, Simon ; Kaakoush, Nadeem O. ; Lloyd, Frances ; McGonigle, Terence ; Mok, Danny ; Baird, Angela ; Klopcic, Borut ; Gordon, Lavinia ; Gorman, Shelley ; Forest, Cynthia ; Bouillon, Roger ; Lawrance, Ian C. ; Hart, Prue H. / High Dose Vitamin D supplementation alters faecal microbiome and predisposes mice to more severe colitis. In: Scientific Reports. 2018 ; Vol. 8, No. 1.
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Ghaly, S, Kaakoush, NO, Lloyd, F, McGonigle, T, Mok, D, Baird, A, Klopcic, B, Gordon, L, Gorman, S, Forest, C, Bouillon, R, Lawrance, IC & Hart, PH 2018, 'High Dose Vitamin D supplementation alters faecal microbiome and predisposes mice to more severe colitis' Scientific Reports, vol. 8, no. 1, 11511. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-29759-y

High Dose Vitamin D supplementation alters faecal microbiome and predisposes mice to more severe colitis. / Ghaly, Simon; Kaakoush, Nadeem O.; Lloyd, Frances; McGonigle, Terence; Mok, Danny; Baird, Angela; Klopcic, Borut; Gordon, Lavinia; Gorman, Shelley; Forest, Cynthia; Bouillon, Roger; Lawrance, Ian C.; Hart, Prue H.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 8, No. 1, 11511, 01.12.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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