Helix I of beta-arrestin is involved in postendocytic trafficking but is not required for membrane translocation, receptor binding, and internalization

D.T. Dinh, H. Qian, Ruth Seeber, Esther Lim, Kevin Pfleger, Karin Eidne, W.G. Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

beta-arrestins bind to phosphorylated, seven-transmembrane-spanning, G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), including the type 1 angiotensin II receptor (AT(1)R), to promote receptor desensitization and internalization. The AT(1)R is a class B GPCR that recruits both beta-arrestin1 and beta-arrestin2, forming stable complexes that cotraffic to deep-core endocytic vesicles. beta-Arrestins contain one amphipathic and potentially amphitropic (membrane-targeting) alpha-helix (helix I) that may promote translocation to the membrane or influence receptor internalization or trafficking. Here, we investigated the trafficking and function of beta-arrestin1 and beta-arrestin2 mutants bearing substitutions in both the hydrophobic and positively charged faces of helix I. The level of expression of these mutants and their cytoplasmic localization ( in the absence of receptor activation) was similar to wild-type beta-arrestins. After angiotensin II stimulation, both wild-type and beta-arrestin mutants translocated to the cell membrane, although recruitment was weaker for mutants of the hydrophobic face of helix I. For all beta-arrestin mutants, the formation of deep-core vesicles was less observed compared with wild-type beta-arrestins. Furthermore, helix I conjugated to green fluorescent protein is not membrane-localized, suggesting that helix I, in isolation, is not amphitropic. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer analysis revealed that both wild-type and beta-arrestin mutants retained a capacity to interact with the AT(1)R, although the interaction with the mutants was less stable. Finally, wild-type and mutant beta-arrestins fully supported receptor internalization in human embryonic kidney cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts deficient in beta-arrestin1 and -2. Thus, helix I is implicated in postmembrane trafficking but is not strongly amphitropic.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)375-382
JournalMolecular Pharmacology
Volume67
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

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