Heightened ruminative disposition is associated with impaired attentional disengagement from negative relative to positive information: support for the “impaired disengagement” hypothesis

Felicity Southworth, Ben Grafton, Colin MacLeod, Ed Watkins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Information processing accounts of rumination propose that impaired attentional disengagement from negative information may underpin heightened disposition to experience ruminative brooding in response to negative mood. The present study examined the relationship between individual differences in ruminative disposition and selective attention, using a paradigm capable of distinguishing between biases in the engagement and disengagement of attention. Results showed that higher dispositional ruminative brooding, as measured by both the brooding subscale of the RRS and an in-vivo assessment of ruminative disposition, was associated with greater relative impairment disengaging attention from negative compared to positive stimuli. These findings thus provide support for the “impaired disengagement” account of ruminative brooding.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)422-434
Number of pages13
JournalCognition and Emotion
Volume31
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Apr 2017

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