Hearing aid review appointment: Clients’ reasons for attendance and non-attendance

Rebecca J. Bennett, Marousia Zhang, Wilhelmina Mulders, Inge Stegeman, Benjamin Vagg, Christopher Brennan-Jones, Robert Eikelboom

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To investigate hearing aid owners’ decisions to attend or not attend an annual hearing aid review appointment. To investigate possible factors associated with appointment attendance, including age, gender, transportation, travel time, hearing aid use, and hearing aid benefit.
Design: A prospective cohort study. Potential participants were notified of their annual hearing aid review appointment in the usual process employed by their clinic. Two months later, potential participants were identified as those who had attended and those who had not attended an appointment.
Study sample: One hundred and twenty adult hearing aid users ranging in age from 26 to 100 (M = 74, SD = 11) years recruited from a single hearing clinic in Perth, Western Australia.
Results: Factors found to be significantly associated with attendance at an annual hearing aid review appointment included hearing aid funding source (government subsidised), participants valuing the importance and benefit of the appointment, and superior hearing aid outcomes.
Conclusions: Within a controlled practice setting, appointment attendance is influenced by some factors modifiable by the clinician, including reducing the cost of the appointment or including them in the initial costs of the rehabilitation program, providing more flexible delivery methods to avoid barriers due to distance/transportation, and providing better education about the content and purpose of the HAR appointment.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Audiology
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 18 Sep 2019

Fingerprint

Hearing Aids
Appointments and Schedules
costs
rehabilitation
funding
travel
gender
Costs and Cost Analysis
education
Western Australia
Hearing
Cohort Studies
Rehabilitation
Prospective Studies
Education

Cite this

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title = "Hearing aid review appointment: Clients’ reasons for attendance and non-attendance",
abstract = "Objective: To investigate hearing aid owners’ decisions to attend or not attend an annual hearing aid review appointment. To investigate possible factors associated with appointment attendance, including age, gender, transportation, travel time, hearing aid use, and hearing aid benefit. Design: A prospective cohort study. Potential participants were notified of their annual hearing aid review appointment in the usual process employed by their clinic. Two months later, potential participants were identified as those who had attended and those who had not attended an appointment. Study sample: One hundred and twenty adult hearing aid users ranging in age from 26 to 100 (M = 74, SD = 11) years recruited from a single hearing clinic in Perth, Western Australia. Results: Factors found to be significantly associated with attendance at an annual hearing aid review appointment included hearing aid funding source (government subsidised), participants valuing the importance and benefit of the appointment, and superior hearing aid outcomes. Conclusions: Within a controlled practice setting, appointment attendance is influenced by some factors modifiable by the clinician, including reducing the cost of the appointment or including them in the initial costs of the rehabilitation program, providing more flexible delivery methods to avoid barriers due to distance/transportation, and providing better education about the content and purpose of the HAR appointment.",
author = "Bennett, {Rebecca J.} and Marousia Zhang and Wilhelmina Mulders and Inge Stegeman and Benjamin Vagg and Christopher Brennan-Jones and Robert Eikelboom",
year = "2019",
month = "9",
day = "18",
doi = "10.1080/14992027.2019.1663373",
language = "English",
journal = "International Journal of Audiology",
issn = "1499-2027",
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T2 - Clients’ reasons for attendance and non-attendance

AU - Bennett, Rebecca J.

AU - Zhang, Marousia

AU - Mulders, Wilhelmina

AU - Stegeman, Inge

AU - Vagg, Benjamin

AU - Brennan-Jones, Christopher

AU - Eikelboom, Robert

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N2 - Objective: To investigate hearing aid owners’ decisions to attend or not attend an annual hearing aid review appointment. To investigate possible factors associated with appointment attendance, including age, gender, transportation, travel time, hearing aid use, and hearing aid benefit. Design: A prospective cohort study. Potential participants were notified of their annual hearing aid review appointment in the usual process employed by their clinic. Two months later, potential participants were identified as those who had attended and those who had not attended an appointment. Study sample: One hundred and twenty adult hearing aid users ranging in age from 26 to 100 (M = 74, SD = 11) years recruited from a single hearing clinic in Perth, Western Australia. Results: Factors found to be significantly associated with attendance at an annual hearing aid review appointment included hearing aid funding source (government subsidised), participants valuing the importance and benefit of the appointment, and superior hearing aid outcomes. Conclusions: Within a controlled practice setting, appointment attendance is influenced by some factors modifiable by the clinician, including reducing the cost of the appointment or including them in the initial costs of the rehabilitation program, providing more flexible delivery methods to avoid barriers due to distance/transportation, and providing better education about the content and purpose of the HAR appointment.

AB - Objective: To investigate hearing aid owners’ decisions to attend or not attend an annual hearing aid review appointment. To investigate possible factors associated with appointment attendance, including age, gender, transportation, travel time, hearing aid use, and hearing aid benefit. Design: A prospective cohort study. Potential participants were notified of their annual hearing aid review appointment in the usual process employed by their clinic. Two months later, potential participants were identified as those who had attended and those who had not attended an appointment. Study sample: One hundred and twenty adult hearing aid users ranging in age from 26 to 100 (M = 74, SD = 11) years recruited from a single hearing clinic in Perth, Western Australia. Results: Factors found to be significantly associated with attendance at an annual hearing aid review appointment included hearing aid funding source (government subsidised), participants valuing the importance and benefit of the appointment, and superior hearing aid outcomes. Conclusions: Within a controlled practice setting, appointment attendance is influenced by some factors modifiable by the clinician, including reducing the cost of the appointment or including them in the initial costs of the rehabilitation program, providing more flexible delivery methods to avoid barriers due to distance/transportation, and providing better education about the content and purpose of the HAR appointment.

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