Healthcare-seeking behaviour and utilization of treatment in a community-based screening study for obstructive sleep apnoea in Busselton, Western Australia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: To investigate whether in-home screening for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) promotes healthcare-seeking or lifestyle modification behaviour. We also examined the uptake and adherence rates to different treatment options, the factors affecting adherence, and the impact of treatment on health-related quality of life. Design: Follow-up survey of adults at high risk of OSA. Setting: Community-based sample. Participants: Adults who completed an in-home sleep study in the 2005-07 or 2010-15 Busselton surveys of adults with apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) > 15 (n = 192). Measurements: The follow-up questionnaire was administered in 2016 and assessed healthcare-seeking and lifestyle modification behaviour, treatment utilization and adherence, and health-related quality of life. Results: Of the 159 that recalled receiving a result from their in-home sleep study, 65% (n = 103) sought help and/or made lifestyle changes, 49% (n = 78) discussed the results with their GP, 21% (n = 33) underwent a confirmatory study and 33% (n = 53) started treatment. The most common treatment used was continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) (72%) and adherence rates were high (84%). Self-reported snoring, breathing pauses, daytime tiredness and AHI were identified as predictors of whether people displayed healthcare-seeking behaviour. Conclusions: This study provides promising evidence that in-home screening for OSA could contribute towards relieving the associated morbidity, especially if health promotion strategies including education are implemented.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)91-100
JournalSleep Health
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2019

Fingerprint

Western Australia
Obstructive Sleep Apnea
Delivery of Health Care
Life Style
Behavior Therapy
Apnea
Sleep
Quality of Life
Therapeutics
Snoring
Continuous Positive Airway Pressure
Health Promotion
Respiration
Morbidity
Education
Surveys and Questionnaires

Cite this

@article{84a550e21cfd47bd8759e53621a9824e,
title = "Healthcare-seeking behaviour and utilization of treatment in a community-based screening study for obstructive sleep apnoea in Busselton, Western Australia",
abstract = "Objectives: To investigate whether in-home screening for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) promotes healthcare-seeking or lifestyle modification behaviour. We also examined the uptake and adherence rates to different treatment options, the factors affecting adherence, and the impact of treatment on health-related quality of life. Design: Follow-up survey of adults at high risk of OSA. Setting: Community-based sample. Participants: Adults who completed an in-home sleep study in the 2005-07 or 2010-15 Busselton surveys of adults with apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) > 15 (n = 192). Measurements: The follow-up questionnaire was administered in 2016 and assessed healthcare-seeking and lifestyle modification behaviour, treatment utilization and adherence, and health-related quality of life. Results: Of the 159 that recalled receiving a result from their in-home sleep study, 65{\%} (n = 103) sought help and/or made lifestyle changes, 49{\%} (n = 78) discussed the results with their GP, 21{\%} (n = 33) underwent a confirmatory study and 33{\%} (n = 53) started treatment. The most common treatment used was continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) (72{\%}) and adherence rates were high (84{\%}). Self-reported snoring, breathing pauses, daytime tiredness and AHI were identified as predictors of whether people displayed healthcare-seeking behaviour. Conclusions: This study provides promising evidence that in-home screening for OSA could contribute towards relieving the associated morbidity, especially if health promotion strategies including education are implemented.",
keywords = "CPAP, OSA, Screening, Sleep apnoea",
author = "Rhian Munks and Matthew Knuiman and Michael Hunter and David Hillman and Mark Divitini and Alan James",
year = "2019",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1016/j.sleh.2018.10.009",
language = "English",
volume = "5",
pages = "91--100",
journal = "Sleep Health",
issn = "2352-7218",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Healthcare-seeking behaviour and utilization of treatment in a community-based screening study for obstructive sleep apnoea in Busselton, Western Australia

AU - Munks, Rhian

AU - Knuiman, Matthew

AU - Hunter, Michael

AU - Hillman, David

AU - Divitini, Mark

AU - James, Alan

PY - 2019/2

Y1 - 2019/2

N2 - Objectives: To investigate whether in-home screening for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) promotes healthcare-seeking or lifestyle modification behaviour. We also examined the uptake and adherence rates to different treatment options, the factors affecting adherence, and the impact of treatment on health-related quality of life. Design: Follow-up survey of adults at high risk of OSA. Setting: Community-based sample. Participants: Adults who completed an in-home sleep study in the 2005-07 or 2010-15 Busselton surveys of adults with apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) > 15 (n = 192). Measurements: The follow-up questionnaire was administered in 2016 and assessed healthcare-seeking and lifestyle modification behaviour, treatment utilization and adherence, and health-related quality of life. Results: Of the 159 that recalled receiving a result from their in-home sleep study, 65% (n = 103) sought help and/or made lifestyle changes, 49% (n = 78) discussed the results with their GP, 21% (n = 33) underwent a confirmatory study and 33% (n = 53) started treatment. The most common treatment used was continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) (72%) and adherence rates were high (84%). Self-reported snoring, breathing pauses, daytime tiredness and AHI were identified as predictors of whether people displayed healthcare-seeking behaviour. Conclusions: This study provides promising evidence that in-home screening for OSA could contribute towards relieving the associated morbidity, especially if health promotion strategies including education are implemented.

AB - Objectives: To investigate whether in-home screening for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) promotes healthcare-seeking or lifestyle modification behaviour. We also examined the uptake and adherence rates to different treatment options, the factors affecting adherence, and the impact of treatment on health-related quality of life. Design: Follow-up survey of adults at high risk of OSA. Setting: Community-based sample. Participants: Adults who completed an in-home sleep study in the 2005-07 or 2010-15 Busselton surveys of adults with apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) > 15 (n = 192). Measurements: The follow-up questionnaire was administered in 2016 and assessed healthcare-seeking and lifestyle modification behaviour, treatment utilization and adherence, and health-related quality of life. Results: Of the 159 that recalled receiving a result from their in-home sleep study, 65% (n = 103) sought help and/or made lifestyle changes, 49% (n = 78) discussed the results with their GP, 21% (n = 33) underwent a confirmatory study and 33% (n = 53) started treatment. The most common treatment used was continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) (72%) and adherence rates were high (84%). Self-reported snoring, breathing pauses, daytime tiredness and AHI were identified as predictors of whether people displayed healthcare-seeking behaviour. Conclusions: This study provides promising evidence that in-home screening for OSA could contribute towards relieving the associated morbidity, especially if health promotion strategies including education are implemented.

KW - CPAP

KW - OSA

KW - Screening

KW - Sleep apnoea

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85056388004&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.sleh.2018.10.009

DO - 10.1016/j.sleh.2018.10.009

M3 - Article

VL - 5

SP - 91

EP - 100

JO - Sleep Health

JF - Sleep Health

SN - 2352-7218

IS - 1

ER -