Harnessing the Plant Microbiome for Improved Abiotic Stress Tolerance

Syed Sarfraz Hussain, Samina Mehnaz, Kadambot H. M. Siddique

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperChapter

Abstract

The benefits of the green revolution in agriculture are over because current agricultural productivity has touched its limits of effectiveness in increasing plant yield. This problem is complicated by shrinking farmland, high labour costs and biotic and abiotic stresses. In fact, global agriculture and increased production would depend on the application and utilisation of microorganisms of agricultural importance, which will serve as an alternative strategy for higher crop productivity in the future. Efficient microbes play a key role in integrated management practices such as biotic and abiotic stresses and nutrient management to reduce chemical use and improve cultivar performance. On the other hand, high food demand and ever-increasing population increase pressure and urgency of how to exploit the microbiome for high crop yields and reduced losses caused by environmental stresses. This chapter highlights the importance of the designer plant microbiome, a strategy that may provide an effective and sustainable increase in crop yield and ultimately leads to food security by efficiently tackling biotic and abiotic stresses.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPLANT MICROBIOME: STRESS RESPONSE
EditorsD Egamberdieva, P Ahmad
Place of PublicationNetherlands
PublisherSpringer Singapore
Pages21-43
Number of pages23
Volume5
ISBN (Electronic)9789811055140
ISBN (Print)9789811055133
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Feb 2018

Publication series

NameMicroorganisms for Sustainability
PublisherSPRINGER-VERLAG SINGAPORE PTE LTD
Volume5
ISSN (Print)2512-1901

Cite this

Hussain, S. S., Mehnaz, S., & Siddique, K. H. M. (2018). Harnessing the Plant Microbiome for Improved Abiotic Stress Tolerance. In D. Egamberdieva, & P. Ahmad (Eds.), PLANT MICROBIOME: STRESS RESPONSE (Vol. 5, pp. 21-43). (Microorganisms for Sustainability; Vol. 5). Netherlands: Springer Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-5514-0_2
Hussain, Syed Sarfraz ; Mehnaz, Samina ; Siddique, Kadambot H. M. / Harnessing the Plant Microbiome for Improved Abiotic Stress Tolerance. PLANT MICROBIOME: STRESS RESPONSE. editor / D Egamberdieva ; P Ahmad. Vol. 5 Netherlands : Springer Singapore, 2018. pp. 21-43 (Microorganisms for Sustainability).
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Hussain, SS, Mehnaz, S & Siddique, KHM 2018, Harnessing the Plant Microbiome for Improved Abiotic Stress Tolerance. in D Egamberdieva & P Ahmad (eds), PLANT MICROBIOME: STRESS RESPONSE. vol. 5, Microorganisms for Sustainability, vol. 5, Springer Singapore, Netherlands, pp. 21-43. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-5514-0_2

Harnessing the Plant Microbiome for Improved Abiotic Stress Tolerance. / Hussain, Syed Sarfraz; Mehnaz, Samina; Siddique, Kadambot H. M.

PLANT MICROBIOME: STRESS RESPONSE. ed. / D Egamberdieva; P Ahmad. Vol. 5 Netherlands : Springer Singapore, 2018. p. 21-43 (Microorganisms for Sustainability; Vol. 5).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperChapter

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AB - The benefits of the green revolution in agriculture are over because current agricultural productivity has touched its limits of effectiveness in increasing plant yield. This problem is complicated by shrinking farmland, high labour costs and biotic and abiotic stresses. In fact, global agriculture and increased production would depend on the application and utilisation of microorganisms of agricultural importance, which will serve as an alternative strategy for higher crop productivity in the future. Efficient microbes play a key role in integrated management practices such as biotic and abiotic stresses and nutrient management to reduce chemical use and improve cultivar performance. On the other hand, high food demand and ever-increasing population increase pressure and urgency of how to exploit the microbiome for high crop yields and reduced losses caused by environmental stresses. This chapter highlights the importance of the designer plant microbiome, a strategy that may provide an effective and sustainable increase in crop yield and ultimately leads to food security by efficiently tackling biotic and abiotic stresses.

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KW - Plant nutrition

KW - Abiotic stress

KW - GROWTH-PROMOTING RHIZOBACTERIA

KW - ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI

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KW - BACTERIAL ROOT MICROBIOTA

KW - LENGTH CDNA MICROARRAY

KW - ZEA-MAYS L.

KW - MAX L MERR

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KW - SALT STRESS

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SP - 21

EP - 43

BT - PLANT MICROBIOME: STRESS RESPONSE

A2 - Egamberdieva, D

A2 - Ahmad, P

PB - Springer Singapore

CY - Netherlands

ER -

Hussain SS, Mehnaz S, Siddique KHM. Harnessing the Plant Microbiome for Improved Abiotic Stress Tolerance. In Egamberdieva D, Ahmad P, editors, PLANT MICROBIOME: STRESS RESPONSE. Vol. 5. Netherlands: Springer Singapore. 2018. p. 21-43. (Microorganisms for Sustainability). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-5514-0_2