Gut microbiota and metabolomics profiles in patients with chronic stable angina and acute coronary syndrome

Adilah F. Ahmad, Jose A. Caparrós-Martin, Nicola Gray, Samantha Lodge, Julien Wist, Silvia Lee, Fergal O'Gara, Girish Dwivedi, Natalie C. Ward

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Web of Science)

Abstract

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. The gut microbiota and its associated metabolites may be involved in the development and progression of CVD, although the mechanisms and impact on clinical outcomes are not fully understood. This study investigated the gut microbiome profile and associated metabolites in patients with chronic stable angina (CSA) and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) compared with healthy controls. Bacterial alpha diversity in stool from patients with ACS or CSA was comparable to healthy controls at both baseline and follow-up visits. Differential abundance analysis identified operational taxonomic units (OTUs) assigned to commensal taxa differentiating patients with ACS from healthy controls at both baseline and follow-up. Patients with CSA and ACS had significantly higher levels of trimethylamine N-oxide compared with healthy controls (CSA: 0.032 ± 0.023 mmol/L, P < 0.01 vs. healthy, and ACS: 0.032 ± 0.023 mmol/L, P = 0.02 vs. healthy, respectively). Patients with ACS had reduced levels of propionate and butyrate (119 ± 4 vs. 139 ± 5.1 µM, P = 0.001, and 14 ± 4.3 vs. 23.5 ± 8.1 µM, P < 0.001, respectively), as well as elevated serum sCD14 (2245 ± 75.1 vs. 1834 ± 45.8 ng/mL, P < 0.0001) and sCD163 levels (457.3 ± 31.8 vs. 326.8 ± 20.7 ng/mL, P = 0.001), compared with healthy controls at baseline. Furthermore, a modified small molecule metabolomic and lipidomic signature was observed in patients with CSA and ACS compared with healthy controls. These findings provide evidence of a link between gut microbiome composition and gut bacterial metabolites with CVD. Future time course studies in patients to observe temporal changes and subsequent associations with gut microbiome composition are required to provide insight into how these are affected by transient changes following an acute coronary event.NEW & NOTEWORTHY The study found discriminative microorganisms differentiating patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) from healthy controls. In addition, reduced levels of certain bacterial metabolites and elevated sCD14 and sCD163 were observed in patients with ACS compared with healthy controls. Furthermore, modified small molecule metabolomic and lipidomic signatures were found in both patient groups. Although it is not known whether these differences in profiles are associated with disease development and/or progression, the findings provide exciting options for potential new disease-related mechanism(s) and associated therapeutic target(s).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)48-64
Number of pages17
JournalPhysiological Genomics
Volume56
Issue number1
Early online date19 Dec 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2024

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