Growth and seed yield of lentil (Lens culinaris Medikus) genotypes of West Asian and South Asian origin and crossbreds between the two under rainfed conditions in Nepal

R. Shrestha, Kadambot Siddique, Neil Turner, David Turner, Jens Berger

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Abstract

Nineteen diverse lentil genotypes, 8 originating from South Asia, 6 from West Asia, and 5 crossbreds using parents from South Asia and West Asia (or other Mediterranean environments), were evaluated for growth, phenology, yield, and yield components at Khumaltar in the mid-hill region of Nepal. Additionally, dry matter production, partitioning, root growth and water use of 8 selected genotypes from the 3 groups were measured at key phenological stages. The seed yield of the West Asian genotypes was only 330 kg/ha, whereas the South Asian genotypes produced a mean seed yield of 1270 kg/ha. The crossbreds had a significantly (P = 0.05) greater seed yield ( 1550 kg/ ha) than the South Asian genotypes. The high seed yield of both the South Asian and crossbred genotypes was associated with rapid ground cover, early flowering and maturity, a long reproductive period, a greater number of seeds and pods, high total dry matter, greater harvest index, and high water use efficiency. West Asian genotypes, on the other hand, flowered 43 days later, matured 15 days later, and had a shorter reproductive period (by 22 days) than the crossbred and South Asian genotypes. The 23% greater seed yield in the crossbreds compared with the South Asian genotypes was the result of a similar increase in seed size (weight per seed).There were no significant differences in total root length (mean 4.7 km/m(2)), root dry matter (mean 95.5 g/m(2)), or water use among the 3 groups during the major part of the growing period. There was a significant difference in total water use due to the longer growing season of the West Asian genotype ILL 7983 and its ability to use late-season rainfall. Maximum water use efficiencies for seed yield of 7.0 kg/ha.mm and for above-ground dry matter of 18.9 kg/ha.mm were comparable with those reported in India and the Mediterranean environments of south-western Australia and Syria.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)971-981
JournalAustralian Journal of Agricultural Research
Volume56
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

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Lens culinaris
Nepal
lentils
seed yield
crossbreds
genotype
West Asia
South Asia
Mediterranean climate
water use efficiency
seeds
Syria
water
harvest index
South Australia
yield components
Western Australia
dry matter accumulation
phenology
pods

Cite this

@article{50278f18a2be474c93594eed130a0a1a,
title = "Growth and seed yield of lentil (Lens culinaris Medikus) genotypes of West Asian and South Asian origin and crossbreds between the two under rainfed conditions in Nepal",
abstract = "Nineteen diverse lentil genotypes, 8 originating from South Asia, 6 from West Asia, and 5 crossbreds using parents from South Asia and West Asia (or other Mediterranean environments), were evaluated for growth, phenology, yield, and yield components at Khumaltar in the mid-hill region of Nepal. Additionally, dry matter production, partitioning, root growth and water use of 8 selected genotypes from the 3 groups were measured at key phenological stages. The seed yield of the West Asian genotypes was only 330 kg/ha, whereas the South Asian genotypes produced a mean seed yield of 1270 kg/ha. The crossbreds had a significantly (P = 0.05) greater seed yield ( 1550 kg/ ha) than the South Asian genotypes. The high seed yield of both the South Asian and crossbred genotypes was associated with rapid ground cover, early flowering and maturity, a long reproductive period, a greater number of seeds and pods, high total dry matter, greater harvest index, and high water use efficiency. West Asian genotypes, on the other hand, flowered 43 days later, matured 15 days later, and had a shorter reproductive period (by 22 days) than the crossbred and South Asian genotypes. The 23{\%} greater seed yield in the crossbreds compared with the South Asian genotypes was the result of a similar increase in seed size (weight per seed).There were no significant differences in total root length (mean 4.7 km/m(2)), root dry matter (mean 95.5 g/m(2)), or water use among the 3 groups during the major part of the growing period. There was a significant difference in total water use due to the longer growing season of the West Asian genotype ILL 7983 and its ability to use late-season rainfall. Maximum water use efficiencies for seed yield of 7.0 kg/ha.mm and for above-ground dry matter of 18.9 kg/ha.mm were comparable with those reported in India and the Mediterranean environments of south-western Australia and Syria.",
author = "R. Shrestha and Kadambot Siddique and Neil Turner and David Turner and Jens Berger",
year = "2005",
doi = "10.1071/AR05050",
language = "English",
volume = "56",
pages = "971--981",
journal = "Crop & Pasture Science",
issn = "1836-0947",
publisher = "CSIRO Publishing",
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}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Growth and seed yield of lentil (Lens culinaris Medikus) genotypes of West Asian and South Asian origin and crossbreds between the two under rainfed conditions in Nepal

AU - Shrestha, R.

AU - Siddique, Kadambot

AU - Turner, Neil

AU - Turner, David

AU - Berger, Jens

PY - 2005

Y1 - 2005

N2 - Nineteen diverse lentil genotypes, 8 originating from South Asia, 6 from West Asia, and 5 crossbreds using parents from South Asia and West Asia (or other Mediterranean environments), were evaluated for growth, phenology, yield, and yield components at Khumaltar in the mid-hill region of Nepal. Additionally, dry matter production, partitioning, root growth and water use of 8 selected genotypes from the 3 groups were measured at key phenological stages. The seed yield of the West Asian genotypes was only 330 kg/ha, whereas the South Asian genotypes produced a mean seed yield of 1270 kg/ha. The crossbreds had a significantly (P = 0.05) greater seed yield ( 1550 kg/ ha) than the South Asian genotypes. The high seed yield of both the South Asian and crossbred genotypes was associated with rapid ground cover, early flowering and maturity, a long reproductive period, a greater number of seeds and pods, high total dry matter, greater harvest index, and high water use efficiency. West Asian genotypes, on the other hand, flowered 43 days later, matured 15 days later, and had a shorter reproductive period (by 22 days) than the crossbred and South Asian genotypes. The 23% greater seed yield in the crossbreds compared with the South Asian genotypes was the result of a similar increase in seed size (weight per seed).There were no significant differences in total root length (mean 4.7 km/m(2)), root dry matter (mean 95.5 g/m(2)), or water use among the 3 groups during the major part of the growing period. There was a significant difference in total water use due to the longer growing season of the West Asian genotype ILL 7983 and its ability to use late-season rainfall. Maximum water use efficiencies for seed yield of 7.0 kg/ha.mm and for above-ground dry matter of 18.9 kg/ha.mm were comparable with those reported in India and the Mediterranean environments of south-western Australia and Syria.

AB - Nineteen diverse lentil genotypes, 8 originating from South Asia, 6 from West Asia, and 5 crossbreds using parents from South Asia and West Asia (or other Mediterranean environments), were evaluated for growth, phenology, yield, and yield components at Khumaltar in the mid-hill region of Nepal. Additionally, dry matter production, partitioning, root growth and water use of 8 selected genotypes from the 3 groups were measured at key phenological stages. The seed yield of the West Asian genotypes was only 330 kg/ha, whereas the South Asian genotypes produced a mean seed yield of 1270 kg/ha. The crossbreds had a significantly (P = 0.05) greater seed yield ( 1550 kg/ ha) than the South Asian genotypes. The high seed yield of both the South Asian and crossbred genotypes was associated with rapid ground cover, early flowering and maturity, a long reproductive period, a greater number of seeds and pods, high total dry matter, greater harvest index, and high water use efficiency. West Asian genotypes, on the other hand, flowered 43 days later, matured 15 days later, and had a shorter reproductive period (by 22 days) than the crossbred and South Asian genotypes. The 23% greater seed yield in the crossbreds compared with the South Asian genotypes was the result of a similar increase in seed size (weight per seed).There were no significant differences in total root length (mean 4.7 km/m(2)), root dry matter (mean 95.5 g/m(2)), or water use among the 3 groups during the major part of the growing period. There was a significant difference in total water use due to the longer growing season of the West Asian genotype ILL 7983 and its ability to use late-season rainfall. Maximum water use efficiencies for seed yield of 7.0 kg/ha.mm and for above-ground dry matter of 18.9 kg/ha.mm were comparable with those reported in India and the Mediterranean environments of south-western Australia and Syria.

U2 - 10.1071/AR05050

DO - 10.1071/AR05050

M3 - Article

VL - 56

SP - 971

EP - 981

JO - Crop & Pasture Science

JF - Crop & Pasture Science

SN - 1836-0947

IS - 9

ER -