Group reward contingencies and cooperative learning: immediate and delayed effects on academic performance, self-esteem and sociometric ratings

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While cooperative learning methods have been reported to have positive effects on a range of personal and social student outcomes, research into their academic benefits has produced mixed results. This study evaluated the effects of one cooperative learning method (cooperative reading and integrated composition, or CIRC) on the reading achievement, sociometric ratings, and self-esteem of 83 third-graders under three reward conditions (group rewards, individual rewards, and no rewards). Although students in the group rewards condition achieved significantly (p <0.05) higher rate and accuracy scores on weekly reading quizzes than those in the individual and no rewards conditions, this effect was not reflected in overall pre–post reading test scores. There were also no significant effects for condition on the sociometric questionnaire. There was, however, a significant condition by sex interaction effect on total self-esteem scores, which indicated higher scores in the group rewards condition than in the other two conditions for girls. Results are interpreted in light of their practical implications for the application of the CIRC method in school settings, and their theoretical implications for research on the impact of group reward contingencies in cooperative learning methods. This revised version was published online in August 2006 with corrections to the Cover Date.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)73-84
JournalSocial Psychology of Education
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2004

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Group reward contingencies and cooperative learning: immediate and delayed effects on academic performance, self-esteem and sociometric ratings'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this