Grounding at a distance

Sam Baron, Kristie Miller, Jonathan Tallant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

What distinguishes causation from grounding? One suggestion is that causation, but not grounding, occurs over time. Recently, however, counterexamples to this simple temporal criterion have been offered. In this paper, we situate the temporal criterion within a broader framework that focuses on two aspects: locational overlapping in space and time and the presence of intermediaries in space and time. We consider, and reject, the idea that the difference between grounding and causation is that grounding can occur without intermediaries. We go on to use the fact that grounding and causation both involve intermediaries to develop a better temporal criterion for distinguishing causation from grounding. The criterion is this: when a cause and effect are spatially disjoint, there is always a chain of causal intermediaries between the cause and the effect that are extended in time. By contrast, when the grounds and the grounded are spatially disjoint, there is always a chain of grounding intermediaries, but the chain need not be extended in time, it can be purely spatial. The difference between grounding and causation, then, is that causation requires time for chaining in a way that grounding does not.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPhilosophical Studies
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 27 Nov 2019

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Baron, Sam ; Miller, Kristie ; Tallant, Jonathan. / Grounding at a distance. In: Philosophical Studies. 2019.
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Grounding at a distance. / Baron, Sam; Miller, Kristie; Tallant, Jonathan.

In: Philosophical Studies, 27.11.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Miller, Kristie

AU - Tallant, Jonathan

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