Green and blue light photoreceptors are involved in maintenance of dormancy in imbibed annual ryegrass (Lolium rigidum) seeds

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Abstract

Light plays an important role in two separate processes within the seeds of Lolium rigidum (annual ryegrass). Dormant seeds of L. rigidum remain dormant when imbibed in the light, but once seeds have lost dormancy through dark-stratification, light stimulates their germination. This study characterizes the light qualities and quantities which are effective in maintenance of dormancy.Dormant seeds were stratified under narrow- and broad-waveband light to identify the potential photoreceptors involved in dormancy maintenance, and to determine whether dark-induced dormancy loss is reversible by light.Blue and green light both mediated dormancy maintenance in a far-red-independent manner. Red light resulted in dormancy maintenance only when far-red wavelengths were excluded, suggesting a redundant function of phytochrome. At low fluence rates, white light was more effective than monochromatic light, suggesting the action of multiple photoreceptors in dormancy maintenance. By contrast, nondormant seeds did not germinate unless provided with red light.These results indicate that seed dormancy maintenance is potentially mediated through the actions of blue and green light photoreceptors. Seed dormancy could thus be added to the growing list of plant responses that may be mediated by green light in a cryptochrome-independent manner.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)81-89
JournalNew Phytologist
Volume180
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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