Google DeepMind and Healthcare in an Age of Algorithms

Julia Powles, Hal Hodson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)
1 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Data-driven tools and techniques, particularly machine learning methods that underpin artificial intelligence, offer promise in improving healthcare systems and services. One of the companies aspiring to pioneer these advances is DeepMind Technologies Limited, a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Google conglomerate, Alphabet Inc. In 2016, DeepMind announced its first major health project: a collaboration with the Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust, to assist in the management of acute kidney injury. Initially received with great enthusiasm, the collaboration has suffered from a lack of clarity and openness, with issues of privacy and power emerging as potent challenges as the project has unfolded. Taking the DeepMind-Royal Free case study as its pivot, this article draws a number of lessons on the transfer of population-derived datasets to large private prospectors, identifying critical questions for policy-makers, industry and individuals as healthcare moves into an algorithmic age.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)351-367
JournalHealth And Technology
Volume7
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Mar 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Delivery of Health Care
Privacy
Artificial Intelligence
Administrative Personnel
Acute Kidney Injury
Artificial intelligence
Learning systems
Industry
Health
Technology
Population
Datasets
Machine Learning

Cite this

Powles, Julia ; Hodson, Hal. / Google DeepMind and Healthcare in an Age of Algorithms. In: Health And Technology. 2017 ; Vol. 7, No. 4. pp. 351-367.
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Google DeepMind and Healthcare in an Age of Algorithms. / Powles, Julia; Hodson, Hal.

In: Health And Technology, Vol. 7, No. 4, 16.03.2017, p. 351-367.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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