GOODBYE, SHANZHAI: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS AND THE END OF COPYCAT CHINA

Lawrence Page

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The unprecedented development of the Chinese economy has entered a new phase. Increasingly, China is moving away from its traditional affinity for imitation towards a strategy of aggressive innovation. This emerging evolution of Chinese industries into effective innovators is of enormous consequence for Australian businesses seeking to work alongside or compete against China. This paper traces the development of copycat culture, or 'shanzhai', and the emergence of an innovation economy in China. It explores the future of intellectual property rights in China and argues in favour of its ability to foster a legal and political system that strengthens its position as an innovation powerhouse. Part II outlines the origins of shanzhai and Part III evaluates its social and economic impact. Part IV explores China's transition from an imitation to innovation economy and Part V discusses its promising future of intellectual property protections.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)185-195
Number of pages11
JournalUniversity of Western Australia Law Review
Volume45
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2019

Cite this

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GOODBYE, SHANZHAI : INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS AND THE END OF COPYCAT CHINA. / Page, Lawrence.

In: University of Western Australia Law Review, Vol. 45, No. 1, 06.2019, p. 185-195.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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