Going to market with DeweyFish: the journey from partnership to commercialisation

Kylie Black, Cornelia Hooper, Ian Castleden, Nader Aryamanesh, Harvey Millar

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperConference paper

Abstract

In 2016-7, The University of Western Australia Library partnered with researchers in the Australian Research Council’s Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology to produce cropPAL2, a database providing the subcellular locations for proteins in crops significant for food production. The project was funded by the Australian National Data Service as part of its High Value Collections program, with the team consisting of computational biologists, software engineers and a librarian. The project involved many hours of manual article evaluation and data extraction by specialists in the plant species included in cropPAL, and the team decided that developing in-house software could make managing the process of article evaluation by multiple people much easier. Key software features were that it prevented assessing the same article twice, simplified finding and adding new articles to the database, provided real-time access by international group members, and the cut and drop function facilitated saving images and notes. Use of this software represented a 90% saving in time and therefore salaries.

The team realised the in-house software could be applied across many areas of research. Known as Team DeweyFish, the group embarked on the CSIRO’s ON Prime program in 2018 to learn how to commercialise the software. This process involved the team generating and testing 15 hypotheses about researcher behaviour through conducting 66 one on one interviews with potential users. This data lead to some significant insights, clarifying the needs of various user groups and refining the software specifications. An initial target market has been selected, and the team is now working towards developing a commercialisable prototype. This paper will discuss the role of the Library as a key player in this collaboration, a first for the University of WA, both in the innovative process and as a key driver in directing the development towards the wider benefit of researchers at UWA and beyond.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the IATUL Conferences
Place of PublicationUSA
PublisherPurdue University Press
Publication statusPublished - 14 Aug 2019
Event40th Annual IATUL Conference: Shifting Sands and Rising Tides - Leading Libraries through Innovation - University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia
Duration: 23 Jun 201927 Jun 2019
http://www.iatul2019.org/?pgid=1486 (IATUL 2019)

Conference

Conference40th Annual IATUL Conference
Abbreviated titleIATUL 2019
CountryAustralia
CityPerth
Period23/06/1927/06/19
OtherThe International Association of University Libraries (IATUL) invites you to attend the 40th Annual IATUL Conference at The University of Western Australia and Curtin University in Perth, Australia from 23 June to 27 June 2019. This is an excellent opportunity to hear about the latest academic library initiatives and network with colleagues and friends from all over the world.
Technology has fundamentally changed the role of the academic library and how it operates. This is evident in the increased access to digital sources of knowledge, and digital tools and services for students, teachers and researchers along with the increasingly important role of the library’s physical place on campus. The IATUL 2019 conference themes will provide ample opportunity to explore and learn about how the library can enable work, study and research in higher education.
Internet address

Fingerprint

commercialization
market
hypothesis testing
software
salary
evaluation
group membership
biology
engineer
librarian
Group
driver
food
energy
interview

Cite this

Black, K., Hooper, C., Castleden, I., Aryamanesh, N., & Millar, H. (2019). Going to market with DeweyFish: the journey from partnership to commercialisation. In Proceedings of the IATUL Conferences [4] USA: Purdue University Press.
Black, Kylie ; Hooper, Cornelia ; Castleden, Ian ; Aryamanesh, Nader ; Millar, Harvey. / Going to market with DeweyFish : the journey from partnership to commercialisation. Proceedings of the IATUL Conferences. USA : Purdue University Press, 2019.
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abstract = "In 2016-7, The University of Western Australia Library partnered with researchers in the Australian Research Council’s Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology to produce cropPAL2, a database providing the subcellular locations for proteins in crops significant for food production. The project was funded by the Australian National Data Service as part of its High Value Collections program, with the team consisting of computational biologists, software engineers and a librarian. The project involved many hours of manual article evaluation and data extraction by specialists in the plant species included in cropPAL, and the team decided that developing in-house software could make managing the process of article evaluation by multiple people much easier. Key software features were that it prevented assessing the same article twice, simplified finding and adding new articles to the database, provided real-time access by international group members, and the cut and drop function facilitated saving images and notes. Use of this software represented a 90{\%} saving in time and therefore salaries.The team realised the in-house software could be applied across many areas of research. Known as Team DeweyFish, the group embarked on the CSIRO’s ON Prime program in 2018 to learn how to commercialise the software. This process involved the team generating and testing 15 hypotheses about researcher behaviour through conducting 66 one on one interviews with potential users. This data lead to some significant insights, clarifying the needs of various user groups and refining the software specifications. An initial target market has been selected, and the team is now working towards developing a commercialisable prototype. This paper will discuss the role of the Library as a key player in this collaboration, a first for the University of WA, both in the innovative process and as a key driver in directing the development towards the wider benefit of researchers at UWA and beyond.",
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Black, K, Hooper, C, Castleden, I, Aryamanesh, N & Millar, H 2019, Going to market with DeweyFish: the journey from partnership to commercialisation. in Proceedings of the IATUL Conferences., 4, Purdue University Press, USA, 40th Annual IATUL Conference, Perth, Australia, 23/06/19.

Going to market with DeweyFish : the journey from partnership to commercialisation. / Black, Kylie; Hooper, Cornelia; Castleden, Ian; Aryamanesh, Nader; Millar, Harvey.

Proceedings of the IATUL Conferences. USA : Purdue University Press, 2019. 4.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperConference paper

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AU - Aryamanesh, Nader

AU - Millar, Harvey

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N2 - In 2016-7, The University of Western Australia Library partnered with researchers in the Australian Research Council’s Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology to produce cropPAL2, a database providing the subcellular locations for proteins in crops significant for food production. The project was funded by the Australian National Data Service as part of its High Value Collections program, with the team consisting of computational biologists, software engineers and a librarian. The project involved many hours of manual article evaluation and data extraction by specialists in the plant species included in cropPAL, and the team decided that developing in-house software could make managing the process of article evaluation by multiple people much easier. Key software features were that it prevented assessing the same article twice, simplified finding and adding new articles to the database, provided real-time access by international group members, and the cut and drop function facilitated saving images and notes. Use of this software represented a 90% saving in time and therefore salaries.The team realised the in-house software could be applied across many areas of research. Known as Team DeweyFish, the group embarked on the CSIRO’s ON Prime program in 2018 to learn how to commercialise the software. This process involved the team generating and testing 15 hypotheses about researcher behaviour through conducting 66 one on one interviews with potential users. This data lead to some significant insights, clarifying the needs of various user groups and refining the software specifications. An initial target market has been selected, and the team is now working towards developing a commercialisable prototype. This paper will discuss the role of the Library as a key player in this collaboration, a first for the University of WA, both in the innovative process and as a key driver in directing the development towards the wider benefit of researchers at UWA and beyond.

AB - In 2016-7, The University of Western Australia Library partnered with researchers in the Australian Research Council’s Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology to produce cropPAL2, a database providing the subcellular locations for proteins in crops significant for food production. The project was funded by the Australian National Data Service as part of its High Value Collections program, with the team consisting of computational biologists, software engineers and a librarian. The project involved many hours of manual article evaluation and data extraction by specialists in the plant species included in cropPAL, and the team decided that developing in-house software could make managing the process of article evaluation by multiple people much easier. Key software features were that it prevented assessing the same article twice, simplified finding and adding new articles to the database, provided real-time access by international group members, and the cut and drop function facilitated saving images and notes. Use of this software represented a 90% saving in time and therefore salaries.The team realised the in-house software could be applied across many areas of research. Known as Team DeweyFish, the group embarked on the CSIRO’s ON Prime program in 2018 to learn how to commercialise the software. This process involved the team generating and testing 15 hypotheses about researcher behaviour through conducting 66 one on one interviews with potential users. This data lead to some significant insights, clarifying the needs of various user groups and refining the software specifications. An initial target market has been selected, and the team is now working towards developing a commercialisable prototype. This paper will discuss the role of the Library as a key player in this collaboration, a first for the University of WA, both in the innovative process and as a key driver in directing the development towards the wider benefit of researchers at UWA and beyond.

KW - cropPAL

KW - partnerships

KW - commercialisation

KW - market research

KW - software development

KW - DeweyFish

M3 - Conference paper

BT - Proceedings of the IATUL Conferences

PB - Purdue University Press

CY - USA

ER -

Black K, Hooper C, Castleden I, Aryamanesh N, Millar H. Going to market with DeweyFish: the journey from partnership to commercialisation. In Proceedings of the IATUL Conferences. USA: Purdue University Press. 2019. 4