Go write your own story: an exploration of online fan fiction and authorship through the themes of authority, conflict and legitimacy

Gemma Sheree Bothe

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

This thesis examines relationships between social agents who participate, create and consume media through fan fiction, and other fan practices, within the Web 2.0 environment. The themes of authority, conflict and legitimacy are examined through; Stephen Amell's Facebook page, romantic relationships (ships) in the television series Arrow (2012- ), and the commercial fan-fiction website Kindle Worlds, to show that authorship plays a central role in consumers and producers interactions with media and each other. By examining media producers' and fans' constructions of authorship the power exerted to implement a dominant vision of the field of media production and consumption is made apparent.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Award date10 Mar 2017
Publication statusUnpublished - 2016

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facebook
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interaction

Cite this

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KW - Media consumption

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