Global prevalence of poor sleep quality in cancer patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Meng Yi Chen, Wan Ying Zheng, Yu Fei Liu, Xiao Hong Li, Mei Ieng Lam, Zhaohui Su, Teris Cheung, Gabor S. Ungvari, Lili Tang, Chee H. Ng, Qinge Zhang, Yu Tao Xiang

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Poor sleep quality is common in patients with cancer, but the prevalence rates varied widely across studies. This systematic review and meta-analysis examined the pooled prevalence of poor sleep quality among patients with cancer. Methods: Systematic literature searches were independently conducted in the major databases (Web of Science, PubMed, EMBASE and PsycINFO). Studies that reported the prevalence of poor sleep quality in patients with cancer were analyzed using a random effects model. Funnel plots and Egger's tests were used to assess publication bias. Statistical analyses were performed using R software. Results: A total of 59 epidemiological studies involving 16,223 patients were included. The pooled prevalence of poor sleep quality in patients with cancer was 57.4% [95% confidence interval (CI): 53.3% - 61.6%]. Additionally, three comparative studies with 372 patients and 412 healthy controls were included. Compared to healthy controls, patients with cancer had a significantly higher risk for poor sleep quality [odd ratio (OR) = 3.0; 95%CI: 1.2–7.2; P < 0.05]. Subgroup analyses of the studies revealed that studies from Middle East & North Africa region and low income countries, and on gynecological cancer as well as those with a lower cut-off value of sleep quality (all P < 0.01) reported a higher prevalence of poor sleep quality. Meta-regression analyses showed that higher prevalence of poor sleep quality was associated with higher prevalence of comorbid depression (P < 0.05) and anxiety (P < 0.01), but was associated with a lower education level (P < 0.05) and alcohol use ratio (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Poor sleep quality is common among patients with cancer. Considering the overall high prevalence rate and negative impact of poor sleep quality, appropriate measures to identify and improve poor sleep quality are needed to enhance the clinical outcomes in this group.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)92-102
Number of pages11
JournalGeneral Hospital Psychiatry
Volume87
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2024

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