Geophysical constraints on the nature of the Highland Boundary Fault Zone in Western Scotland

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    10 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Previously published models of gravity anomalies across the Highland Boundary Fault in western Scotland interpret this structure as a high-angle reverse fault. These gravity anomalies have been re-interpreted in the light of more extensive gravity data now available, and new density data from the Highland Border Complex. The new data suggest that earlier interpretations have over-estimated the fault anomaly and used over-simplified density models. New gravity models of the Highland Boundary Fault Zone are presented which show that the interface between the Dalradian and Highland Border Complex dips to the northwest at an angle of about 20-degrees. We interpret the contact between these two formations as a thrust fault. The interface between the Highland Border Complex and the Lower Old Red Sandstone is shown to be vertical as suggested by surface geology, with the latter rocks a few hundred metres thick.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)411-419
    JournalGeological Magazine
    Volume129
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1992

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    fault zone
    gravity anomaly
    gravity
    Old Red Sandstone
    Dalradian
    reverse fault
    thrust fault
    dip
    geology
    anomaly
    rock
    border

    Cite this

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    title = "Geophysical constraints on the nature of the Highland Boundary Fault Zone in Western Scotland",
    abstract = "Previously published models of gravity anomalies across the Highland Boundary Fault in western Scotland interpret this structure as a high-angle reverse fault. These gravity anomalies have been re-interpreted in the light of more extensive gravity data now available, and new density data from the Highland Border Complex. The new data suggest that earlier interpretations have over-estimated the fault anomaly and used over-simplified density models. New gravity models of the Highland Boundary Fault Zone are presented which show that the interface between the Dalradian and Highland Border Complex dips to the northwest at an angle of about 20-degrees. We interpret the contact between these two formations as a thrust fault. The interface between the Highland Border Complex and the Lower Old Red Sandstone is shown to be vertical as suggested by surface geology, with the latter rocks a few hundred metres thick.",
    author = "Mike Dentith and Allan Trench and B.J. Bluck",
    year = "1992",
    doi = "10.1017/S0016756800019506",
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    Geophysical constraints on the nature of the Highland Boundary Fault Zone in Western Scotland. / Dentith, Mike; Trench, Allan; Bluck, B.J.

    In: Geological Magazine, Vol. 129, 1992, p. 411-419.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Geophysical constraints on the nature of the Highland Boundary Fault Zone in Western Scotland

    AU - Dentith, Mike

    AU - Trench, Allan

    AU - Bluck, B.J.

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    AB - Previously published models of gravity anomalies across the Highland Boundary Fault in western Scotland interpret this structure as a high-angle reverse fault. These gravity anomalies have been re-interpreted in the light of more extensive gravity data now available, and new density data from the Highland Border Complex. The new data suggest that earlier interpretations have over-estimated the fault anomaly and used over-simplified density models. New gravity models of the Highland Boundary Fault Zone are presented which show that the interface between the Dalradian and Highland Border Complex dips to the northwest at an angle of about 20-degrees. We interpret the contact between these two formations as a thrust fault. The interface between the Highland Border Complex and the Lower Old Red Sandstone is shown to be vertical as suggested by surface geology, with the latter rocks a few hundred metres thick.

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