Genome assembly of the pioneer species Plantago major L. (Plantaginaceae) provides insight into its global distribution and adaptation to metal-contaminated soil

Shanwu Lyu, Qiming Mei, Hui Liu, Baosheng Wang, Jun Wang, Hans Lambers, Zhengfeng Wang, Bin Dong, Zhanfeng Liu, Shulin Deng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Plantago is a major genus belonging to the Plantaginaceae family and is used in herbal medicine, functional food, and pastures. Several Plantago species are also characterized by their global distribution, but the mechanism underpinning this is not known. Here, we present a high-quality, chromosome-level genome assembly of Plantago major L., a species of Plantago, by incorporating Oxford Nanopore sequencing and Hi-C technologies. The genome assembly size was approximately 671.27 Mb with a contig N50 length of 31.30 Mb. 31,654 protein-coding genes were identified from the genome. Evolutionary analysis showed that P. major diverged from other Lamiales species at ~62.18 Mya and experienced two rounds of WGD events. Notably, many gene families related to plant acclimation and adaptation expanded. We also found that many polyphenol biosynthesis genes showed high expression patterns in roots. Some amino acid biosynthesis genes, such as those involved in histidine synthesis, were highly induced under metal (Ni) stress that led to the accumulation of corresponding metabolites. These results suggest persuasive arguments for the global distribution of P. major through multiscale analysis. Decoding the P. major genome provides a valuable genomic resource for research on dissecting biological function, molecular evolution, taxonomy, and breeding.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberdsad013
JournalDNA Research
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2023

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