Genetic susceptibility to infectious diseases: big is beautiful, but will bigger be even better?

David Burgner, S.E. Jamieson, Jenefer Blackwell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

137 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Genetic epidemiology, including twin studies, provides robust evidence that genetic variation in human populations contributes to susceptibility to infectious disease. One of the major limitations of studies that attempt to identify the genes and mechanisms that underlie this susceptibility has been lack of power caused by small sample size. With the development of novel technologies, burgeoning information on the human genome, the HapMap project, and human genetic diversity, we are at the beginning of a new era in the study of the genetics of complex diseases. This review looks afresh at the epidemiological evidence that supports a role for genetics in susceptibility to infectious disease, examines the somewhat limited achievements to date, and discusses current advances in methodology and technology that will potentially lead to translational data in the future.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)653-663
JournalThe Lancet Infectious Diseases
Volume6
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

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