Gender Discrimination in Training: An Australian Perspective

Paul Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Analysis of the Australian How Workers Get Their Training survey indicates considerable male-female differentials in the incidence and duration of training. For external training, which women can undertake without the sanction of the firm, the gender effect is that women undertake more training than men, other things being the same. However, for in-house training, which requires the sanction of the firm, the gender effect is that women undertake less training than men, other things being the same. One interpretation of this is that the gender effect reflects both the discriminatory attitudes held by firms and the greater propensity to train among women, with the relative weights varying across types of training according to the discretion that women have in determining the training outcome.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)539-564
JournalBritish Journal of Industrial Relations: an international journal of employment relations
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1994

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Gender Discrimination in Training: An Australian Perspective'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this