Gender differences in attitudes towards antipsychotic medications in patients with schizophrenia

J. Zhou, Y.T. Xiang, Q. Li, X. Zhu, W. Li, Gabor Ungvari, C.H. Ng, D. Ongur, X. Wang

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    Abstract

    © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.Non-adherence was more frequent in male than in female psychiatric patients. This multi-center study in China examined the gender difference with regard to attitude towards antipsychotic medications and its associations with socio-demographic variables, insight, and psychopathology. Patients’ basic socio-demographic and clinical data were collected. Psychopathology and insight were measured with the Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90) and the Insight and Treatment Attitudes Questionnaire (ITAQ), respectively. Their attitudes towards antipsychotic medications were assessed by two standardized questions. Nearly 39.6% (109/275) males and 31.1% (70/225) females reported negative attitudes towards antipsychotic medications. Binary logistic regression revealed that in males single marital status (OR=2.9, 95% CI=1.3–6.4), rural residence (OR=0.4, 95% CI=0.2–0.7), longer duration of schizophrenia (OR=1.0, 95% CI=1.0–1.1), knowledge of medication (OR=1.5, 95% CI=1.3–1.6) and the SCL-90 hostility subscale (OR=0.9, 95% CI=0.9–1.0) were contributors to negative attitudes. In female patients, knowledge about medications (OR=1.4, 95% CI=1.3–1.6), the SCL-90 somatization (OR=0.8, 95% CI=0.8–0.9) and anxiety (OR=1.1, 95% CI=1.0–1.2) subscales were contributors to negative attitudes. The study suggested that different psychosocial and clinical factors accounted for the negative attitude towards antipsychotic treatment in male and female patients.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)276-281
    JournalPsychiatry Research
    Volume245
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2016

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    Antipsychotic Agents
    Schizophrenia
    Checklist
    Psychopathology
    Patient Medication Knowledge
    Demography
    Hostility
    Marital Status
    Ireland
    Psychiatry
    China
    Anxiety
    Logistic Models
    Psychology
    Therapeutics

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    Zhou, J. ; Xiang, Y.T. ; Li, Q. ; Zhu, X. ; Li, W. ; Ungvari, Gabor ; Ng, C.H. ; Ongur, D. ; Wang, X. / Gender differences in attitudes towards antipsychotic medications in patients with schizophrenia. In: Psychiatry Research. 2016 ; Vol. 245. pp. 276-281.
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    title = "Gender differences in attitudes towards antipsychotic medications in patients with schizophrenia",
    abstract = "{\circledC} 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.Non-adherence was more frequent in male than in female psychiatric patients. This multi-center study in China examined the gender difference with regard to attitude towards antipsychotic medications and its associations with socio-demographic variables, insight, and psychopathology. Patients’ basic socio-demographic and clinical data were collected. Psychopathology and insight were measured with the Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90) and the Insight and Treatment Attitudes Questionnaire (ITAQ), respectively. Their attitudes towards antipsychotic medications were assessed by two standardized questions. Nearly 39.6{\%} (109/275) males and 31.1{\%} (70/225) females reported negative attitudes towards antipsychotic medications. Binary logistic regression revealed that in males single marital status (OR=2.9, 95{\%} CI=1.3–6.4), rural residence (OR=0.4, 95{\%} CI=0.2–0.7), longer duration of schizophrenia (OR=1.0, 95{\%} CI=1.0–1.1), knowledge of medication (OR=1.5, 95{\%} CI=1.3–1.6) and the SCL-90 hostility subscale (OR=0.9, 95{\%} CI=0.9–1.0) were contributors to negative attitudes. In female patients, knowledge about medications (OR=1.4, 95{\%} CI=1.3–1.6), the SCL-90 somatization (OR=0.8, 95{\%} CI=0.8–0.9) and anxiety (OR=1.1, 95{\%} CI=1.0–1.2) subscales were contributors to negative attitudes. The study suggested that different psychosocial and clinical factors accounted for the negative attitude towards antipsychotic treatment in male and female patients.",
    author = "J. Zhou and Y.T. Xiang and Q. Li and X. Zhu and W. Li and Gabor Ungvari and C.H. Ng and D. Ongur and X. Wang",
    year = "2016",
    doi = "10.1016/j.psychres.2016.08.041",
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    Gender differences in attitudes towards antipsychotic medications in patients with schizophrenia. / Zhou, J.; Xiang, Y.T.; Li, Q.; Zhu, X.; Li, W.; Ungvari, Gabor; Ng, C.H.; Ongur, D.; Wang, X.

    In: Psychiatry Research, Vol. 245, 2016, p. 276-281.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    AU - Xiang, Y.T.

    AU - Li, Q.

    AU - Zhu, X.

    AU - Li, W.

    AU - Ungvari, Gabor

    AU - Ng, C.H.

    AU - Ongur, D.

    AU - Wang, X.

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    AB - © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.Non-adherence was more frequent in male than in female psychiatric patients. This multi-center study in China examined the gender difference with regard to attitude towards antipsychotic medications and its associations with socio-demographic variables, insight, and psychopathology. Patients’ basic socio-demographic and clinical data were collected. Psychopathology and insight were measured with the Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90) and the Insight and Treatment Attitudes Questionnaire (ITAQ), respectively. Their attitudes towards antipsychotic medications were assessed by two standardized questions. Nearly 39.6% (109/275) males and 31.1% (70/225) females reported negative attitudes towards antipsychotic medications. Binary logistic regression revealed that in males single marital status (OR=2.9, 95% CI=1.3–6.4), rural residence (OR=0.4, 95% CI=0.2–0.7), longer duration of schizophrenia (OR=1.0, 95% CI=1.0–1.1), knowledge of medication (OR=1.5, 95% CI=1.3–1.6) and the SCL-90 hostility subscale (OR=0.9, 95% CI=0.9–1.0) were contributors to negative attitudes. In female patients, knowledge about medications (OR=1.4, 95% CI=1.3–1.6), the SCL-90 somatization (OR=0.8, 95% CI=0.8–0.9) and anxiety (OR=1.1, 95% CI=1.0–1.2) subscales were contributors to negative attitudes. The study suggested that different psychosocial and clinical factors accounted for the negative attitude towards antipsychotic treatment in male and female patients.

    U2 - 10.1016/j.psychres.2016.08.041

    DO - 10.1016/j.psychres.2016.08.041

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