Gender and motor competence affects perceived likelihood and importance of physical activity outcomes among 14 year olds

B. Hands, H.E. Parker, E. Rose, Dawne Larkin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Background: Perceptions of the effects of physical activity could facilitate or deter future participation. This study explored the differences between gender and motor competence at 14 years of age in the perceptions of likelihood and importance of physical activity outcomes. Method: The sample comprised 1582 14-year-old adolescents (769 girls) from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study. Four motor competence groups were formed from a standardized Neuromuscular Developmental Index score (McCarron 1997). Perceptions of the likelihood and the importance of 15 physical activity outcomes were measured by a questionnaire developed for the NSW Schools Fitness and Physical Activity Survey (Booth et al. 1997). Gender (two)×motor competence (four) analyses of variance and Tukey post hoc were conducted on outcome scores (P
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)246-252
Number of pages7
JournalChild: Care, Health and Development
Volume42
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2016

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