Gait selection in the ostrich: mechanical and metabolic characteristics of walking and running with and without an aerial phase

J. Rubenson, David Lloyd, D.B. Heliams, Paul Fournier

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    138 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    It has been argued that minimization of metabolic–energy costs is a primary determinant of gait selection in terrestrial animals. This view is based predominantly on data from humans and horses, which have been shown to choose the most economical gait (walking, running, galloping) for any given speed. It is not certain whether a minimization of metabolic costs is associated with the selection of other prevalent forms of terrestrial gaits, such as grounded running (a widespread gait in birds). Using biomechanical and metabolic measurements of four ostriches moving on a treadmill over a range of speeds from 0.8 to 6.7 m s−1, we reveal here that the selection of walking or grounded running at intermediate speeds also favours a reduction in the metabolic cost of locomotion. This gait transition is characterized by a shift in locomotor kinetics from an inverted–pendulum gait to a bouncing gait that lacks an aerial phase. By contrast, when the ostrich adopts an aerial–running gait at faster speeds, there are no abrupt transitions in mechanical parameters or in the metabolic cost of locomotion. These data suggest a continuum between grounded and aerial running, indicating that they belong to the same locomotor paradigm.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1091-1099
    JournalProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
    Volume271
    Issue number1543
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2004

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Gait selection in the ostrich: mechanical and metabolic characteristics of walking and running with and without an aerial phase'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this