Gaining a 'proper sense' of what happens out there: an 'Academic Bush Camp' to promote rural placements for students

Amy Page, Sandy Hamilton, Maeva Hall, Kathryn Fitzgerald, Wayne Warner, Barbara Nattabi, Sandra Thompson

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Abstract

© 2015 National Rural Health Alliance Inc. Undergraduates who undertake rural placements often choose a rural career. Reluctance from universities to send students to rural settings limits placement numbers. The Western Australian Centre for Rural Health (WACRH) invited allied health and nursing academics
and clinical placement coordinators from Western Australian (WA) universities to an Academic Bush Camp. Based on situated learning theory, this camp modelled student programs through experiential learning and structured workshops. It aimed to build relationships and showcase innovative rural learning
opportunities. Objective: To build relationships and showcase innovative
rural learning opportunities. Design: An evaluation of a residential camp based on situated learning theory. Setting: The camp stated and finished in Geraldton,
WA and was centered in Mt Magnet,WA a remote town 600 kilometres northeast of Perth. Participants: WACRH invited allied health and nursing academics and clinical placement coordinators from Western Australian (WA) universities.
Intervention: This camp modelled student programs through experiential learning and structured workshops. Online pre- and post-camp questionnaires included open-ended questions and questions on a 5-point Likert scale. Responses were analysed in SPSS 22 using descriptive statistics and Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Follow-up phone interviews six months later assessed
longer-term reflections and changes in student placement practice.
Main outcome measures: The main outcome measure was whether the camp met participants’ expectations, and their knowledge about and interest in WACRH’s
programs. Results: Twelve academics from five WA universities and seven health disciplines attended. Nine had previously lived or worked rurally. The camp met participants’ expectations and all would recommend the opportunity to a colleague. Many valued the interaction with community and clinical placement partners and would have preferred more of this. The camp increased awareness of WACRH’s programs and benefits of longer rural placements and a
service-learning environment. Six months later, participants’ familiarity with WACRH’s placement model, supports and staff had led to an enhanced willingness to place students. Conclusion: Rural academics can influence rural placement intentions by demonstrating the infrastructure,
learning and academic support available. A camp experience increases metropolitan academics’ awareness of rural placement programs and willingness to encourage student participation. Participants with rural backgrounds
appeared more receptive to rural learning possibilities.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)41-47
Number of pages7
JournalAustralian Journal of Rural Health
Volume24
Issue number1
Early online date29 Jun 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2016

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Learning
Students
Rural Health Services
Problem-Based Learning
Health
Insurance Pools
Nursing
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Education
Rural Health
Magnets
Nonparametric Statistics
Interviews

Cite this

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title = "Gaining a 'proper sense' of what happens out there: an 'Academic Bush Camp' to promote rural placements for students",
abstract = "{\circledC} 2015 National Rural Health Alliance Inc. Undergraduates who undertake rural placements often choose a rural career. Reluctance from universities to send students to rural settings limits placement numbers. The Western Australian Centre for Rural Health (WACRH) invited allied health and nursing academicsand clinical placement coordinators from Western Australian (WA) universities to an Academic Bush Camp. Based on situated learning theory, this camp modelled student programs through experiential learning and structured workshops. It aimed to build relationships and showcase innovative rural learningopportunities. Objective: To build relationships and showcase innovativerural learning opportunities. Design: An evaluation of a residential camp based on situated learning theory. Setting: The camp stated and finished in Geraldton,WA and was centered in Mt Magnet,WA a remote town 600 kilometres northeast of Perth. Participants: WACRH invited allied health and nursing academics and clinical placement coordinators from Western Australian (WA) universities.Intervention: This camp modelled student programs through experiential learning and structured workshops. Online pre- and post-camp questionnaires included open-ended questions and questions on a 5-point Likert scale. Responses were analysed in SPSS 22 using descriptive statistics and Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Follow-up phone interviews six months later assessedlonger-term reflections and changes in student placement practice.Main outcome measures: The main outcome measure was whether the camp met participants’ expectations, and their knowledge about and interest in WACRH’sprograms. Results: Twelve academics from five WA universities and seven health disciplines attended. Nine had previously lived or worked rurally. The camp met participants’ expectations and all would recommend the opportunity to a colleague. Many valued the interaction with community and clinical placement partners and would have preferred more of this. The camp increased awareness of WACRH’s programs and benefits of longer rural placements and aservice-learning environment. Six months later, participants’ familiarity with WACRH’s placement model, supports and staff had led to an enhanced willingness to place students. Conclusion: Rural academics can influence rural placement intentions by demonstrating the infrastructure,learning and academic support available. A camp experience increases metropolitan academics’ awareness of rural placement programs and willingness to encourage student participation. Participants with rural backgroundsappeared more receptive to rural learning possibilities.",
author = "Amy Page and Sandy Hamilton and Maeva Hall and Kathryn Fitzgerald and Wayne Warner and Barbara Nattabi and Sandra Thompson",
year = "2016",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1111/ajr.12199",
language = "English",
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journal = "The Australian Journal of Rural Health",
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T1 - Gaining a 'proper sense' of what happens out there: an 'Academic Bush Camp' to promote rural placements for students

AU - Page, Amy

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AU - Hall, Maeva

AU - Fitzgerald, Kathryn

AU - Warner, Wayne

AU - Nattabi, Barbara

AU - Thompson, Sandra

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N2 - © 2015 National Rural Health Alliance Inc. Undergraduates who undertake rural placements often choose a rural career. Reluctance from universities to send students to rural settings limits placement numbers. The Western Australian Centre for Rural Health (WACRH) invited allied health and nursing academicsand clinical placement coordinators from Western Australian (WA) universities to an Academic Bush Camp. Based on situated learning theory, this camp modelled student programs through experiential learning and structured workshops. It aimed to build relationships and showcase innovative rural learningopportunities. Objective: To build relationships and showcase innovativerural learning opportunities. Design: An evaluation of a residential camp based on situated learning theory. Setting: The camp stated and finished in Geraldton,WA and was centered in Mt Magnet,WA a remote town 600 kilometres northeast of Perth. Participants: WACRH invited allied health and nursing academics and clinical placement coordinators from Western Australian (WA) universities.Intervention: This camp modelled student programs through experiential learning and structured workshops. Online pre- and post-camp questionnaires included open-ended questions and questions on a 5-point Likert scale. Responses were analysed in SPSS 22 using descriptive statistics and Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Follow-up phone interviews six months later assessedlonger-term reflections and changes in student placement practice.Main outcome measures: The main outcome measure was whether the camp met participants’ expectations, and their knowledge about and interest in WACRH’sprograms. Results: Twelve academics from five WA universities and seven health disciplines attended. Nine had previously lived or worked rurally. The camp met participants’ expectations and all would recommend the opportunity to a colleague. Many valued the interaction with community and clinical placement partners and would have preferred more of this. The camp increased awareness of WACRH’s programs and benefits of longer rural placements and aservice-learning environment. Six months later, participants’ familiarity with WACRH’s placement model, supports and staff had led to an enhanced willingness to place students. Conclusion: Rural academics can influence rural placement intentions by demonstrating the infrastructure,learning and academic support available. A camp experience increases metropolitan academics’ awareness of rural placement programs and willingness to encourage student participation. Participants with rural backgroundsappeared more receptive to rural learning possibilities.

AB - © 2015 National Rural Health Alliance Inc. Undergraduates who undertake rural placements often choose a rural career. Reluctance from universities to send students to rural settings limits placement numbers. The Western Australian Centre for Rural Health (WACRH) invited allied health and nursing academicsand clinical placement coordinators from Western Australian (WA) universities to an Academic Bush Camp. Based on situated learning theory, this camp modelled student programs through experiential learning and structured workshops. It aimed to build relationships and showcase innovative rural learningopportunities. Objective: To build relationships and showcase innovativerural learning opportunities. Design: An evaluation of a residential camp based on situated learning theory. Setting: The camp stated and finished in Geraldton,WA and was centered in Mt Magnet,WA a remote town 600 kilometres northeast of Perth. Participants: WACRH invited allied health and nursing academics and clinical placement coordinators from Western Australian (WA) universities.Intervention: This camp modelled student programs through experiential learning and structured workshops. Online pre- and post-camp questionnaires included open-ended questions and questions on a 5-point Likert scale. Responses were analysed in SPSS 22 using descriptive statistics and Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Follow-up phone interviews six months later assessedlonger-term reflections and changes in student placement practice.Main outcome measures: The main outcome measure was whether the camp met participants’ expectations, and their knowledge about and interest in WACRH’sprograms. Results: Twelve academics from five WA universities and seven health disciplines attended. Nine had previously lived or worked rurally. The camp met participants’ expectations and all would recommend the opportunity to a colleague. Many valued the interaction with community and clinical placement partners and would have preferred more of this. The camp increased awareness of WACRH’s programs and benefits of longer rural placements and aservice-learning environment. Six months later, participants’ familiarity with WACRH’s placement model, supports and staff had led to an enhanced willingness to place students. Conclusion: Rural academics can influence rural placement intentions by demonstrating the infrastructure,learning and academic support available. A camp experience increases metropolitan academics’ awareness of rural placement programs and willingness to encourage student participation. Participants with rural backgroundsappeared more receptive to rural learning possibilities.

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JO - The Australian Journal of Rural Health

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