Fusicoccin: A fungal toxin that opens stomata

Neil C. Turner, Antonio Graniti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fusicoccum amygdali Del., the pathogen of almond (Prunus amygdalus St.) and peach (Prunus persica (L.) St.) canker, causes leaves of an infected shoot to wilt and dry, besides causing cankers around infected buds and nodes. These foliar symptoms have been attributed to toxins which are produced by the pathogen at the site of infection and transported in the vascular system1. A toxin, produced in culture by the actively growing mycelium of the pathogen2 has been extracted, purified, and called fusicoccin3. It is a glucoside of a tricarbocyclic terpene with a molecular weight of 680 (ref. 4). When introduced into the xylem, fusicoccin produces symptoms in almond and peach shoots closely resembling those found after an infection of Fusicoccum amygdali2. Furthermore, if tested on cuttings or detached leaves, the toxin affects cuttings from a wide range of plants2.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1070-1071
Number of pages2
JournalNature
Volume223
Issue number5210
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1969
Externally publishedYes

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Pathogens
Terpenes
Molecular weight
Glucosides

Cite this

Turner, Neil C. ; Graniti, Antonio. / Fusicoccin : A fungal toxin that opens stomata. In: Nature. 1969 ; Vol. 223, No. 5210. pp. 1070-1071.
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Fusicoccin : A fungal toxin that opens stomata. / Turner, Neil C.; Graniti, Antonio.

In: Nature, Vol. 223, No. 5210, 1969, p. 1070-1071.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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