Further investigations on the use of lime on established pastures

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In glasshouse experiments the increased nitrogen mineralization resulted in a large response of grass to lime. Light dressings of lime increased yield of clovers. This was not due to correcting manganese toxicity. Heavy dressings of lime depressed yield of clovers. This was not due to induced manganese deficiency but was, at least partly, due to induced phosphorus deficiency. Waterlogging the soil increased phosphorus availability and hence partly overcame the depressive effects of high lime. In field experiments ground limestone at 1 ton an acre was applied to a range of pastures and soil types on the coastal plain of south-western Australia. Pasture responses were poorly related to the original pH of the soil but were proportional to the increase in pH.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)442-449
Number of pages8
JournalAustralian Journal of Experimental Agriculture
Volume5
Issue number19
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1965

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liming materials
pastures
Medicago
Soil
Bandages
Manganese
Phosphorus
manganese
phosphorus
Western Australia
South Australia
Calcium Carbonate
flooded conditions
coastal plains
Poaceae
limestone
soil pH
soil types
mineralization
Nitrogen

Cite this

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Further investigations on the use of lime on established pastures. / Barrow, N. J.

In: Australian Journal of Experimental Agriculture, Vol. 5, No. 19, 01.01.1965, p. 442-449.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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