Full scale instrumented pile response in moderately cemented calcareous soil

B. S. Riyat, B. M. Lehane

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperConference paperpeer-review

Abstract

The design of drilled and grouted piles in carbonate soils remains a challenging geotechnical problem primarily due to high variability in the levels of cementation. Carbonate rocks encountered in offshore Australia typically comprise well cemented calcarenites embedded within loose and poorly cemented sands and silts. This paper extends the sparse database of instrumented axial load tests on drilled and grouted piles in similar conditions by presenting the results from static tension tests and tension cycling of three piles with diameters ranging from 225mm to 450mm. Constant normal stiffness shear tests, including cycling, are presented to assist interpretation of the pile tests. Shaft frictions inferred from strain gauge measurements are compared with CPT qc data and a design correlation for the relationship with qc is suggested by combining the trends observed with the results of other experimental studies on grouted piles in calcarenite. It is also shown that the cyclic response can be captured using the measured monotonic response combined with the algorithm employed in the RATZ load transfer software.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEngineering in Chalk - Proceedings of the Chalk 2018 Conference
EditorsJames A. Lawrence, Martin Preene, Ursula L. Lawrence, Roisin Buckley
PublisherICE Publishing Ltd.
Pages389-395
Number of pages7
ISBN (Electronic)9780727764072
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018
EventChalk 2018 Conference: Engineering in Chalk - London, United Kingdom
Duration: 17 Sep 201818 Sep 2018

Publication series

NameEngineering in Chalk - Proceedings of the Chalk 2018 Conference

Conference

ConferenceChalk 2018 Conference: Engineering in Chalk
Country/TerritoryUnited Kingdom
CityLondon
Period17/09/1818/09/18

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