Front-of-neck airway rescue with impalpable anatomy during a simulated cannot intubate, cannot oxygenate scenario: scalpel–finger–cannula versus scalpel–finger–bougie in a sheep model

Andrew Heard, Helen Gordon, Scott Douglas, Nicholas Grainger, Hans Avis, Philip Vlaskovsky, Andrew Toner, Betty Thomas, Chris Kennedy, Hannah Perlman, Joanna Fox, Kelly Tarrant, Natasha De Silva, Patrick Eakins, Prabir Patel, Samuel Fitzpatrick, Shona Bright, Sinead O'Keefe, Thy Do, Veterinary Staff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Front-of-neck airway rescue in a cannot intubate, cannot oxygenate (CICO) scenario with impalpable anatomy is particularly challenging. Several techniques have been described based on a midline vertical neck incision with subsequent finger dissection, followed by either a cannula or scalpel puncture of the now palpated airway. We explored whether the speed of rescue oxygenation differs between these techniques. Methods: In a high-fidelity simulation of a CICO scenario in anaesthetised Merino sheep with impalpable front-of-neck anatomy, 35 consecutive eligible participants undergoing airway training performed scalpel–finger–cannula and scalpel–finger–bougie in a random order. The primary outcome was time from airway palpation to first oxygen delivery. Data, were analysed with Cox proportional hazards. Results: Scalpel–finger–cannula was associated with shorter time to first oxygen delivery on univariate (hazard ratio [HR]=11.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.14–25.13; P

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)184-191
Number of pages8
JournalBritish Journal of Anaesthesia
Volume125
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2020

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