From the porous spaces on the bubble: the life and work of Japanese expatriate employees in Indonesia and their relations with the host society

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Abstract

This ethnographic study challenges the dominant view in the social science literature that expatriates live in a ‘bubble’ separated from host societies. An analysis of relations between Japanese and host national employees reveals the functional strength of structurally weak ties (Granovetter 1973) and highlights both ‘closure’ and ‘openness’ in interpersonal interactions. Applying the concepts of cosmopolitanism, social capital, and network theory, the thesis suggests that ties forged through face-to-face interactions in porous spaces on the bubble support the emergence of a latent transnational business/social community beyond national boundaries. This thesis contributes to the intersections of transnational and business studies.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Baldassar, Loretta, Supervisor
  • Acciaioli, Greg, Supervisor
  • Pinches, Michael, Supervisor
Thesis sponsors
Award date8 May 2012
Publication statusUnpublished - 2011

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Indonesia
employee
cosmopolitanism
interaction
social capital
social network
social science
society
community
Society
literature

Cite this

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title = "From the porous spaces on the bubble: the life and work of Japanese expatriate employees in Indonesia and their relations with the host society",
abstract = "This ethnographic study challenges the dominant view in the social science literature that expatriates live in a ‘bubble’ separated from host societies. An analysis of relations between Japanese and host national employees reveals the functional strength of structurally weak ties (Granovetter 1973) and highlights both ‘closure’ and ‘openness’ in interpersonal interactions. Applying the concepts of cosmopolitanism, social capital, and network theory, the thesis suggests that ties forged through face-to-face interactions in porous spaces on the bubble support the emergence of a latent transnational business/social community beyond national boundaries. This thesis contributes to the intersections of transnational and business studies.",
keywords = "expatriates, host national employees, weak ties, transnational cooperation, work relationships, Social capital, Cosmopolitanism, transnational relationships, Japan, Indonesia, cross-cultural management",
author = "Yukimi Shimoda",
year = "2011",
language = "English",
school = "The University of Western Australia",

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AB - This ethnographic study challenges the dominant view in the social science literature that expatriates live in a ‘bubble’ separated from host societies. An analysis of relations between Japanese and host national employees reveals the functional strength of structurally weak ties (Granovetter 1973) and highlights both ‘closure’ and ‘openness’ in interpersonal interactions. Applying the concepts of cosmopolitanism, social capital, and network theory, the thesis suggests that ties forged through face-to-face interactions in porous spaces on the bubble support the emergence of a latent transnational business/social community beyond national boundaries. This thesis contributes to the intersections of transnational and business studies.

KW - expatriates

KW - host national employees

KW - weak ties

KW - transnational cooperation

KW - work relationships

KW - Social capital

KW - Cosmopolitanism

KW - transnational relationships

KW - Japan

KW - Indonesia

KW - cross-cultural management

UR - http://research-repository.uwa.edu.au/en/publications/record(b1b8fb9b-4af0-4b9f-bc72-c20b82c249d2).html

M3 - Doctoral Thesis

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