From primitive image to traditional Chinese art: the significance of nature in the development of Chinese landscape painting, from neolithic times to Imperial China

Anna Chung

Research output: ThesisMaster's Thesis

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Abstract

This master’s dissertation studies of the development of traditional Chinese landscape painting. This dissertation traces the nature worship of Neolithic times in China and its influence upon the development of traditional Chinese landscape painting. The time frame analysed in this dissertation spans the beginning of agriculture to the maturity of the painting, from Neolithic China to the Song Dynasty (960 CE – 1279 CE). The development of Chinese landscape is used in this dissertation to demonstrate the continuity of nature in art over this time because: the history of Chinese landscape painting shows the continual development of natural images between the pre-agricultural and post-agricultural eras; Chinese civilization has been built upon on a close relationship with nature since remote antiquity time; and Chinese civilization and culture is one of the earlier cultures and civilizations. This dissertation argues depicting nature has been rooted in human intellectual faculties since the early stages of human history and that the persistence of nature as a theme in Chinese art suggests that landscape paintings in particular touch upon human innate responses to nature.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationMasters
Publication statusUnpublished - Jul 2014

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