From mudflats to deep-sea habitats: vision in semi-terrestrial fiddler crabs and mesopelagic hyperiid amphipods

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

Many animals rely on vision to guide their behaviour, but maintaining a visual system has a high energy cost. Animals have consequently evolved diverse visual systems adapted to perceive information that is most salient to their life history and habitat. Crustaceans are a group that exemplify a diversity of visual systems. In this thesis, I explore crustaceans that inhabit vastly different habitats: fiddler crabs from bright mudflats and hyperiid amphipods from the dark mesopelagic. I show that both have evolved vision that is adapted to their environments, allowing them to perform visual tasks that are crucial for their survival.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Hemmi, Jan, Supervisor
  • Partridge, Julian, Supervisor
Thesis sponsors
Award date21 Oct 2022
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2022

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