Foliar nutrient concentrations and resorption efficiency in plants of contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies along a 2-million-year dune chronosequence

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    Abstract

    Long-term pedogenesis leads to important changes in the availability of soil nutrients, especially nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). Changes in the availability of micronutrients can also occur, but are less well understood. We explored whether changes in leaf nutrient concentrations and resorption were consistent with a shift from N to P limitation of plant productivity with soil age along a > 2-million-year dune chronosequence in south-western Australia. We also compared these traits among plants of contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies, focusing on N, P and micronutrients. The range in leaf [P] for individual species along the chronosequence was exceptionally large for both green (103-3000 μg P g-1) and senesced (19-5600 μg P g-1) leaves, almost equalling that found globally. From the youngest to the oldest soil, cover-weighted mean leaf [P] declined from 1840 to 228 μg P g-1, while P-resorption efficiency increased from 0% to 79%. All species converged towards a highly conservative P-use strategy on the oldest soils. Declines in cover-weighted mean leaf [N] with soil age were less strong than for leaf [P], ranging from 13.4 mg N g-1 on the youngest soil to 9.5 mg N g-1 on the oldest soil. However, mean leaf N-resorption efficiency was greatest (45%) on the youngest, N-poor soils. Leaf N:P ratio increased from 8 on the youngest soil to 42 on the oldest soil. Leaf zinc (Zn) concentrations were low across all chronosequence stages, but mean Zn-resorption efficiency was greatest (55-74%) on the youngest calcareous dunes, reflecting low Zn availability at high pH. N2-fixing species had high leaf [N] compared with other species. Non-mycorrhizal species had very low leaf [P] and accumulated Mn across all soils. We surmise that this reflects Mn solubilization by organic acids released for P acquisition. Synthesis. Our results show community-wide variation in leaf nutrient concentrations and resorption that is consistent with a shift from N to P limitation during long-term ecosystem development. High Zn resorption on young calcareous dunes supports the possibility of micronutrient co-limitation. High leaf [Mn] on older dunes suggests the importance of carboxylate release for P acquisition. Our results show a strong effect of soil nutrient availability on nutrient-use efficiency and reveal considerable differences among plants of contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies. Foliar nutrient concentrations and resorption efficiencies across a >2-million-year dune chronosequence suggest a shift from nitrogen to phosphorus limitation of productivity during long-term pedogenesis. Leaf manganese accumulation in non-mycorrhizal plants likely reflects carboxylate release for phosphorus acquisition. Our results show a strong effect of nutrient availability on nutrient-use efficiency and reveal considerable differences among plants of contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)396-410
    Number of pages15
    JournalJournal of Ecology
    Volume102
    Issue number2
    Early online date10 Dec 2013
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 19 Feb 2014

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    resorption
    chronosequences
    chronosequence
    dunes
    dune
    nutrient content
    nutrient
    nutrients
    leaves
    soil
    zinc
    dietary minerals
    nutrient use efficiency
    age of soil
    pedogenesis
    trace element
    soil formation
    phosphorus
    nutrient availability
    soil nutrient

    Cite this

    @article{153d2a91761d4682a59e44433471aa42,
    title = "Foliar nutrient concentrations and resorption efficiency in plants of contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies along a 2-million-year dune chronosequence",
    abstract = "Long-term pedogenesis leads to important changes in the availability of soil nutrients, especially nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). Changes in the availability of micronutrients can also occur, but are less well understood. We explored whether changes in leaf nutrient concentrations and resorption were consistent with a shift from N to P limitation of plant productivity with soil age along a > 2-million-year dune chronosequence in south-western Australia. We also compared these traits among plants of contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies, focusing on N, P and micronutrients. The range in leaf [P] for individual species along the chronosequence was exceptionally large for both green (103-3000 μg P g-1) and senesced (19-5600 μg P g-1) leaves, almost equalling that found globally. From the youngest to the oldest soil, cover-weighted mean leaf [P] declined from 1840 to 228 μg P g-1, while P-resorption efficiency increased from 0{\%} to 79{\%}. All species converged towards a highly conservative P-use strategy on the oldest soils. Declines in cover-weighted mean leaf [N] with soil age were less strong than for leaf [P], ranging from 13.4 mg N g-1 on the youngest soil to 9.5 mg N g-1 on the oldest soil. However, mean leaf N-resorption efficiency was greatest (45{\%}) on the youngest, N-poor soils. Leaf N:P ratio increased from 8 on the youngest soil to 42 on the oldest soil. Leaf zinc (Zn) concentrations were low across all chronosequence stages, but mean Zn-resorption efficiency was greatest (55-74{\%}) on the youngest calcareous dunes, reflecting low Zn availability at high pH. N2-fixing species had high leaf [N] compared with other species. Non-mycorrhizal species had very low leaf [P] and accumulated Mn across all soils. We surmise that this reflects Mn solubilization by organic acids released for P acquisition. Synthesis. Our results show community-wide variation in leaf nutrient concentrations and resorption that is consistent with a shift from N to P limitation during long-term ecosystem development. High Zn resorption on young calcareous dunes supports the possibility of micronutrient co-limitation. High leaf [Mn] on older dunes suggests the importance of carboxylate release for P acquisition. Our results show a strong effect of soil nutrient availability on nutrient-use efficiency and reveal considerable differences among plants of contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies. Foliar nutrient concentrations and resorption efficiencies across a >2-million-year dune chronosequence suggest a shift from nitrogen to phosphorus limitation of productivity during long-term pedogenesis. Leaf manganese accumulation in non-mycorrhizal plants likely reflects carboxylate release for phosphorus acquisition. Our results show a strong effect of nutrient availability on nutrient-use efficiency and reveal considerable differences among plants of contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies.",
    keywords = "Manganese accumulation, Nitrogen, Nutrient-resorption efficiency, Nutrient-resorption proficiency, Nutrient-use efficiency, Phosphorus, Plant-soil (below-ground) interactions, Soil fertility gradient, Zinc",
    author = "Patrick Hayes and Turner, {Benjamin L.} and Hans Lambers and Etienne Lalibert{\'e}",
    year = "2014",
    month = "2",
    day = "19",
    doi = "10.1111/1365-2745.12196",
    language = "English",
    volume = "102",
    pages = "396--410",
    journal = "Journal of Ecology",
    issn = "0022-0477",
    publisher = "John Wiley & Sons",
    number = "2",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Foliar nutrient concentrations and resorption efficiency in plants of contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies along a 2-million-year dune chronosequence

    AU - Hayes, Patrick

    AU - Turner, Benjamin L.

    AU - Lambers, Hans

    AU - Laliberté, Etienne

    PY - 2014/2/19

    Y1 - 2014/2/19

    N2 - Long-term pedogenesis leads to important changes in the availability of soil nutrients, especially nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). Changes in the availability of micronutrients can also occur, but are less well understood. We explored whether changes in leaf nutrient concentrations and resorption were consistent with a shift from N to P limitation of plant productivity with soil age along a > 2-million-year dune chronosequence in south-western Australia. We also compared these traits among plants of contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies, focusing on N, P and micronutrients. The range in leaf [P] for individual species along the chronosequence was exceptionally large for both green (103-3000 μg P g-1) and senesced (19-5600 μg P g-1) leaves, almost equalling that found globally. From the youngest to the oldest soil, cover-weighted mean leaf [P] declined from 1840 to 228 μg P g-1, while P-resorption efficiency increased from 0% to 79%. All species converged towards a highly conservative P-use strategy on the oldest soils. Declines in cover-weighted mean leaf [N] with soil age were less strong than for leaf [P], ranging from 13.4 mg N g-1 on the youngest soil to 9.5 mg N g-1 on the oldest soil. However, mean leaf N-resorption efficiency was greatest (45%) on the youngest, N-poor soils. Leaf N:P ratio increased from 8 on the youngest soil to 42 on the oldest soil. Leaf zinc (Zn) concentrations were low across all chronosequence stages, but mean Zn-resorption efficiency was greatest (55-74%) on the youngest calcareous dunes, reflecting low Zn availability at high pH. N2-fixing species had high leaf [N] compared with other species. Non-mycorrhizal species had very low leaf [P] and accumulated Mn across all soils. We surmise that this reflects Mn solubilization by organic acids released for P acquisition. Synthesis. Our results show community-wide variation in leaf nutrient concentrations and resorption that is consistent with a shift from N to P limitation during long-term ecosystem development. High Zn resorption on young calcareous dunes supports the possibility of micronutrient co-limitation. High leaf [Mn] on older dunes suggests the importance of carboxylate release for P acquisition. Our results show a strong effect of soil nutrient availability on nutrient-use efficiency and reveal considerable differences among plants of contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies. Foliar nutrient concentrations and resorption efficiencies across a >2-million-year dune chronosequence suggest a shift from nitrogen to phosphorus limitation of productivity during long-term pedogenesis. Leaf manganese accumulation in non-mycorrhizal plants likely reflects carboxylate release for phosphorus acquisition. Our results show a strong effect of nutrient availability on nutrient-use efficiency and reveal considerable differences among plants of contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies.

    AB - Long-term pedogenesis leads to important changes in the availability of soil nutrients, especially nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). Changes in the availability of micronutrients can also occur, but are less well understood. We explored whether changes in leaf nutrient concentrations and resorption were consistent with a shift from N to P limitation of plant productivity with soil age along a > 2-million-year dune chronosequence in south-western Australia. We also compared these traits among plants of contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies, focusing on N, P and micronutrients. The range in leaf [P] for individual species along the chronosequence was exceptionally large for both green (103-3000 μg P g-1) and senesced (19-5600 μg P g-1) leaves, almost equalling that found globally. From the youngest to the oldest soil, cover-weighted mean leaf [P] declined from 1840 to 228 μg P g-1, while P-resorption efficiency increased from 0% to 79%. All species converged towards a highly conservative P-use strategy on the oldest soils. Declines in cover-weighted mean leaf [N] with soil age were less strong than for leaf [P], ranging from 13.4 mg N g-1 on the youngest soil to 9.5 mg N g-1 on the oldest soil. However, mean leaf N-resorption efficiency was greatest (45%) on the youngest, N-poor soils. Leaf N:P ratio increased from 8 on the youngest soil to 42 on the oldest soil. Leaf zinc (Zn) concentrations were low across all chronosequence stages, but mean Zn-resorption efficiency was greatest (55-74%) on the youngest calcareous dunes, reflecting low Zn availability at high pH. N2-fixing species had high leaf [N] compared with other species. Non-mycorrhizal species had very low leaf [P] and accumulated Mn across all soils. We surmise that this reflects Mn solubilization by organic acids released for P acquisition. Synthesis. Our results show community-wide variation in leaf nutrient concentrations and resorption that is consistent with a shift from N to P limitation during long-term ecosystem development. High Zn resorption on young calcareous dunes supports the possibility of micronutrient co-limitation. High leaf [Mn] on older dunes suggests the importance of carboxylate release for P acquisition. Our results show a strong effect of soil nutrient availability on nutrient-use efficiency and reveal considerable differences among plants of contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies. Foliar nutrient concentrations and resorption efficiencies across a >2-million-year dune chronosequence suggest a shift from nitrogen to phosphorus limitation of productivity during long-term pedogenesis. Leaf manganese accumulation in non-mycorrhizal plants likely reflects carboxylate release for phosphorus acquisition. Our results show a strong effect of nutrient availability on nutrient-use efficiency and reveal considerable differences among plants of contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies.

    KW - Manganese accumulation

    KW - Nitrogen

    KW - Nutrient-resorption efficiency

    KW - Nutrient-resorption proficiency

    KW - Nutrient-use efficiency

    KW - Phosphorus

    KW - Plant-soil (below-ground) interactions

    KW - Soil fertility gradient

    KW - Zinc

    U2 - 10.1111/1365-2745.12196

    DO - 10.1111/1365-2745.12196

    M3 - Article

    VL - 102

    SP - 396

    EP - 410

    JO - Journal of Ecology

    JF - Journal of Ecology

    SN - 0022-0477

    IS - 2

    ER -