Flashes of brilliance: San rock paintings of Heaven's things

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperChapter

Abstract

Life on earth began in the heavens. At least that is how many origin accounts explain our earthly genesis. There is post-enlightenment science’s ‘Big Bang’ and ‘panspermic’ postulation that begetter-like meteorites introduced the vital organic compounds that made our coil mortal (Cooper et al. 2001). Judaeo- Christianity Creation’s extraterrestrial god and the Yoruba heavenly creator Odumare oversaw order out of chaos (Leeming & Leeming 1994). These creation stories are a recent sample of an ancient human thrall and veneration of heavenly bodies (Kelley & Milone 2005). Evidence of this fascination is contained in art, literature, philosophy, stories and archives that cover the last three millennia. For example, in 600 BCE China’s astronomical office employed a thousand workers (Vanin 1999: 15–29). For periods prior to the last 3000 years, it is archaeology that provides almost all the evidence of astral phenomen
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSeeing and knowing
Subtitle of host publicationUnderstanding rock art with and without ethnography
EditorsGeoffrey Blundell, Christopher Chippindale, Benjamin Smith
Place of PublicationJohannesburg
PublisherWitwatersrand University Press
Pages11-35
Number of pages26
Volume3
ISBN (Print)9781868145133
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Publication series

NameRock Art Research Institute monograph Series
Volume3

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chaos
Christianity
evidence
archaeology
god
art
worker
China
science
literature
philosophy

Cite this

Ouzman, S. (2010). Flashes of brilliance: San rock paintings of Heaven's things. In G. Blundell, C. Chippindale, & B. Smith (Eds.), Seeing and knowing: Understanding rock art with and without ethnography (Vol. 3, pp. 11-35). (Rock Art Research Institute monograph Series; Vol. 3). Johannesburg: Witwatersrand University Press.
Ouzman, Sven. / Flashes of brilliance : San rock paintings of Heaven's things. Seeing and knowing: Understanding rock art with and without ethnography. editor / Geoffrey Blundell ; Christopher Chippindale ; Benjamin Smith. Vol. 3 Johannesburg : Witwatersrand University Press, 2010. pp. 11-35 (Rock Art Research Institute monograph Series).
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abstract = "Life on earth began in the heavens. At least that is how many origin accounts explain our earthly genesis. There is post-enlightenment science’s ‘Big Bang’ and ‘panspermic’ postulation that begetter-like meteorites introduced the vital organic compounds that made our coil mortal (Cooper et al. 2001). Judaeo- Christianity Creation’s extraterrestrial god and the Yoruba heavenly creator Odumare oversaw order out of chaos (Leeming & Leeming 1994). These creation stories are a recent sample of an ancient human thrall and veneration of heavenly bodies (Kelley & Milone 2005). Evidence of this fascination is contained in art, literature, philosophy, stories and archives that cover the last three millennia. For example, in 600 BCE China’s astronomical office employed a thousand workers (Vanin 1999: 15–29). For periods prior to the last 3000 years, it is archaeology that provides almost all the evidence of astral phenomen",
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Ouzman, S 2010, Flashes of brilliance: San rock paintings of Heaven's things. in G Blundell, C Chippindale & B Smith (eds), Seeing and knowing: Understanding rock art with and without ethnography. vol. 3, Rock Art Research Institute monograph Series, vol. 3, Witwatersrand University Press, Johannesburg, pp. 11-35.

Flashes of brilliance : San rock paintings of Heaven's things. / Ouzman, Sven.

Seeing and knowing: Understanding rock art with and without ethnography. ed. / Geoffrey Blundell; Christopher Chippindale; Benjamin Smith. Vol. 3 Johannesburg : Witwatersrand University Press, 2010. p. 11-35 (Rock Art Research Institute monograph Series; Vol. 3).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperChapter

TY - CHAP

T1 - Flashes of brilliance

T2 - San rock paintings of Heaven's things

AU - Ouzman, Sven

PY - 2010

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N2 - Life on earth began in the heavens. At least that is how many origin accounts explain our earthly genesis. There is post-enlightenment science’s ‘Big Bang’ and ‘panspermic’ postulation that begetter-like meteorites introduced the vital organic compounds that made our coil mortal (Cooper et al. 2001). Judaeo- Christianity Creation’s extraterrestrial god and the Yoruba heavenly creator Odumare oversaw order out of chaos (Leeming & Leeming 1994). These creation stories are a recent sample of an ancient human thrall and veneration of heavenly bodies (Kelley & Milone 2005). Evidence of this fascination is contained in art, literature, philosophy, stories and archives that cover the last three millennia. For example, in 600 BCE China’s astronomical office employed a thousand workers (Vanin 1999: 15–29). For periods prior to the last 3000 years, it is archaeology that provides almost all the evidence of astral phenomen

AB - Life on earth began in the heavens. At least that is how many origin accounts explain our earthly genesis. There is post-enlightenment science’s ‘Big Bang’ and ‘panspermic’ postulation that begetter-like meteorites introduced the vital organic compounds that made our coil mortal (Cooper et al. 2001). Judaeo- Christianity Creation’s extraterrestrial god and the Yoruba heavenly creator Odumare oversaw order out of chaos (Leeming & Leeming 1994). These creation stories are a recent sample of an ancient human thrall and veneration of heavenly bodies (Kelley & Milone 2005). Evidence of this fascination is contained in art, literature, philosophy, stories and archives that cover the last three millennia. For example, in 600 BCE China’s astronomical office employed a thousand workers (Vanin 1999: 15–29). For periods prior to the last 3000 years, it is archaeology that provides almost all the evidence of astral phenomen

KW - Archaeology

KW - Rock art

KW - Southern Africa

KW - SAND

KW - Bushman

KW - Astronomy

KW - Archaeoastronomy

M3 - Chapter

SN - 9781868145133

VL - 3

T3 - Rock Art Research Institute monograph Series

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BT - Seeing and knowing

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A2 - Chippindale, Christopher

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PB - Witwatersrand University Press

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ER -

Ouzman S. Flashes of brilliance: San rock paintings of Heaven's things. In Blundell G, Chippindale C, Smith B, editors, Seeing and knowing: Understanding rock art with and without ethnography. Vol. 3. Johannesburg: Witwatersrand University Press. 2010. p. 11-35. (Rock Art Research Institute monograph Series).