First response, rehabilitation, and outcomes of hand and upper limb function: survivors of the Bali bombing disaster. A case series report.

D.W. Edgar, Fiona Wood, A. Goodwin-Walters

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    9 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In October 2002, two bombs exploded in Bali injuring hundreds, and killing 202 people. The purpose of this paper is to report the organization of the first response, rehabilitation strategies, and outcome of a series of patients evacuated to the Royal Perth Hospital (RPH), a civilian hospital in Australia. The initial medical response in Bali was primarily conducted by holidaying health professionals supporting the hospital on the island. The Australian Defence Force was primarily responsible for the ongoing acute clinical management during the evacuation and repatriation of survivors to all major burn units in Australia. At the RPH, hospital adaptations included novel staffing and treatment strategies to sustain a team effort beyond the acute phase of the disaster to manage the surge of 28 patients (15% of yearly admissions) in 7 days. Data collected were related to service delivery and patient outcomes (shoulder active range of motion, grip strength, and the Burns Specific Health Scale). Data were compared to baseline, similar data collected during normal practice and population norms. Bali patients received 3.2% more therapy treatment sessions and 6.8% less contact hours than usual protocols. Shoulder AROM recovered to normal limits by 3 months postdischarge. Grip strength for women was shown to reach population norms by I month after discharge and by 6 months for males. Self-rated physical recovery exceeded major burn population norms at 6 months postdischarge. Physical therapy outcome measures demonstrated upper limb recovery as usual in the Bali group, despite a mass casualty situation. To achieve this required support from the multidisciplinary team, in combination with community, government, and hospital administrative assistance.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)283-298
    JournalJournal of Hand Therapy
    Volume19
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2006

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