Field of Dreams: Restitution of Pollinator Services in Restored Bird-Pollinated Plant Populations

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    14 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    © 2014 Society for Ecological Restoration. Ecosystem functionality is an increasingly important objective of ecological restoration. Despite this, a few studies have rigorously assessed reproductive functionality within restored plant populations, and it is largely assumed that pollinators follow restoration of plant communities-"build it and they will come." Here, we applied an ecological genetic approach to determine the impact of spatial separation on mating in Banksia menziesii (Proteaceae), a dominant bird-pollinated species of Banksia woodlands of Western Australia. All plants at three post-mining restored sites (n = 72 [13 years old], n = 21 [8 years old], and n = 20 [9 years old]), as well as a sample from an adjacent natural reference site (n = 42), were genotyped at nine microsatellite loci. Seed set, mating system parameters, realized pollen dispersal through the assignment of paternity to seed, and avian pollinator species composition, abundance and behavior, were assessed. All patches displayed equivalent heterozygosity (He = 0.53-0.59) and very weak genetic divergence (FST ≤ 0.01). Seed of plants within restored sites showed complete outcrossing and relatively high seed set, 26% of which were sired by pollen donors located beyond the local patch. Similar abundance and movement of nectar-feeding birds was observed in restored and natural sites, despite lower bird species diversity in the restored site, where a smaller, less aggressive species was dominant. Our results demonstrate the restitution of wide outcrossing in these restored Banksia patches within an active mine-site, and suggest that restored bird-pollinated Banksia populations are resilient to human impacts, due largely to their generalist pollinator requirements and highly-mobile avian pollinators.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)832-840
    Number of pages9
    JournalRestoration Ecology
    Volume22
    Issue number6
    Early online date29 Oct 2014
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Nov 2014

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    Banksia
    pollinator
    pollinators
    bird
    seed set
    outcrossing
    ecological restoration
    birds
    pollen
    nectar feeding
    seed
    pollen flow
    species diversity
    Proteaceae
    paternity
    nectar
    Spermatophytina
    anthropogenic effect
    generalist
    mating systems

    Cite this

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    title = "Field of Dreams: Restitution of Pollinator Services in Restored Bird-Pollinated Plant Populations",
    abstract = "{\circledC} 2014 Society for Ecological Restoration. Ecosystem functionality is an increasingly important objective of ecological restoration. Despite this, a few studies have rigorously assessed reproductive functionality within restored plant populations, and it is largely assumed that pollinators follow restoration of plant communities-{"}build it and they will come.{"} Here, we applied an ecological genetic approach to determine the impact of spatial separation on mating in Banksia menziesii (Proteaceae), a dominant bird-pollinated species of Banksia woodlands of Western Australia. All plants at three post-mining restored sites (n = 72 [13 years old], n = 21 [8 years old], and n = 20 [9 years old]), as well as a sample from an adjacent natural reference site (n = 42), were genotyped at nine microsatellite loci. Seed set, mating system parameters, realized pollen dispersal through the assignment of paternity to seed, and avian pollinator species composition, abundance and behavior, were assessed. All patches displayed equivalent heterozygosity (He = 0.53-0.59) and very weak genetic divergence (FST ≤ 0.01). Seed of plants within restored sites showed complete outcrossing and relatively high seed set, 26{\%} of which were sired by pollen donors located beyond the local patch. Similar abundance and movement of nectar-feeding birds was observed in restored and natural sites, despite lower bird species diversity in the restored site, where a smaller, less aggressive species was dominant. Our results demonstrate the restitution of wide outcrossing in these restored Banksia patches within an active mine-site, and suggest that restored bird-pollinated Banksia populations are resilient to human impacts, due largely to their generalist pollinator requirements and highly-mobile avian pollinators.",
    author = "K.M. Frick and Alison Ritchie and Siegfried Krauss",
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    Field of Dreams: Restitution of Pollinator Services in Restored Bird-Pollinated Plant Populations. / Frick, K.M.; Ritchie, Alison; Krauss, Siegfried.

    In: Restoration Ecology, Vol. 22, No. 6, 11.2014, p. 832-840.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Field of Dreams: Restitution of Pollinator Services in Restored Bird-Pollinated Plant Populations

    AU - Frick, K.M.

    AU - Ritchie, Alison

    AU - Krauss, Siegfried

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    N2 - © 2014 Society for Ecological Restoration. Ecosystem functionality is an increasingly important objective of ecological restoration. Despite this, a few studies have rigorously assessed reproductive functionality within restored plant populations, and it is largely assumed that pollinators follow restoration of plant communities-"build it and they will come." Here, we applied an ecological genetic approach to determine the impact of spatial separation on mating in Banksia menziesii (Proteaceae), a dominant bird-pollinated species of Banksia woodlands of Western Australia. All plants at three post-mining restored sites (n = 72 [13 years old], n = 21 [8 years old], and n = 20 [9 years old]), as well as a sample from an adjacent natural reference site (n = 42), were genotyped at nine microsatellite loci. Seed set, mating system parameters, realized pollen dispersal through the assignment of paternity to seed, and avian pollinator species composition, abundance and behavior, were assessed. All patches displayed equivalent heterozygosity (He = 0.53-0.59) and very weak genetic divergence (FST ≤ 0.01). Seed of plants within restored sites showed complete outcrossing and relatively high seed set, 26% of which were sired by pollen donors located beyond the local patch. Similar abundance and movement of nectar-feeding birds was observed in restored and natural sites, despite lower bird species diversity in the restored site, where a smaller, less aggressive species was dominant. Our results demonstrate the restitution of wide outcrossing in these restored Banksia patches within an active mine-site, and suggest that restored bird-pollinated Banksia populations are resilient to human impacts, due largely to their generalist pollinator requirements and highly-mobile avian pollinators.

    AB - © 2014 Society for Ecological Restoration. Ecosystem functionality is an increasingly important objective of ecological restoration. Despite this, a few studies have rigorously assessed reproductive functionality within restored plant populations, and it is largely assumed that pollinators follow restoration of plant communities-"build it and they will come." Here, we applied an ecological genetic approach to determine the impact of spatial separation on mating in Banksia menziesii (Proteaceae), a dominant bird-pollinated species of Banksia woodlands of Western Australia. All plants at three post-mining restored sites (n = 72 [13 years old], n = 21 [8 years old], and n = 20 [9 years old]), as well as a sample from an adjacent natural reference site (n = 42), were genotyped at nine microsatellite loci. Seed set, mating system parameters, realized pollen dispersal through the assignment of paternity to seed, and avian pollinator species composition, abundance and behavior, were assessed. All patches displayed equivalent heterozygosity (He = 0.53-0.59) and very weak genetic divergence (FST ≤ 0.01). Seed of plants within restored sites showed complete outcrossing and relatively high seed set, 26% of which were sired by pollen donors located beyond the local patch. Similar abundance and movement of nectar-feeding birds was observed in restored and natural sites, despite lower bird species diversity in the restored site, where a smaller, less aggressive species was dominant. Our results demonstrate the restitution of wide outcrossing in these restored Banksia patches within an active mine-site, and suggest that restored bird-pollinated Banksia populations are resilient to human impacts, due largely to their generalist pollinator requirements and highly-mobile avian pollinators.

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    SN - 1061-2971

    IS - 6

    ER -