Feedback seeking from peers: A positive strategy for insecurely attached team-workers

C. Wu, Sharon Parker, J.P.J. De Jong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Feedback inquiry is a proactive behaviour that is instrumental for gaining information about job performance. However, feedback inquiry also has a social component, especially in the context of flexible team-work environments. Feedback inquiry implies interacting with others, suggesting that relational considerations might affect whether individuals accept and apply feedback to improve their performance. Drawing on this relational perspective, we examined the role of attachment styles in employees' peer-focused feedback inquiry, as well as the subsequent association of feedback inquiry with job performance. We proposed that individuals higher in attachment anxiety would be more inclined to engage in feedback inquiry from peers, whereas those higher in attachment avoidance would be less likely to do so. We also proposed that individuals higher in attachment anxiety would benefit more from feedback inquiry, such that the association between feedback inquiry and performance is stronger for these individuals. Results from multi-source data from 179 employees in a flexible team-work environment and up to three of their peers generally supported these hypotheses. This study broadened our understanding of the dispositional antecedents of feedback inquiry, and suggests a boundary condition for when such behaviour is associated with enhanced job performance. © The Author(s) 2013.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)441-464
JournalHuman Relations
Volume67
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Feedback
worker
job performance
work environment
employee
Feedback seeking
Peers
Workers
Personnel
anxiety
performance
Boundary conditions
Job performance

Cite this

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Feedback seeking from peers: A positive strategy for insecurely attached team-workers. / Wu, C.; Parker, Sharon; De Jong, J.P.J.

In: Human Relations, Vol. 67, No. 4, 2014, p. 441-464.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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