Family-centred approaches to healthcare interventions in chronic diseases in adults: A quantitative systematic review

H. Deek, Sandy Hamilton, N. Brown, S.C. Inglis, M. Digiacomo, P.J. Newton, S. Noureddine, P.S. Macdonald, P.M. Davidson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Background: Increasingly there is a focus on self-care strategies for both malignant and non-malignant conditions. Models of self-care interventions have focussed on the individual and less on the broader context of family and society. In many societies, decision-making and health seeking behaviours, involve family members. Objective: To identify elements of effective family-centred self-care interventions that are likely to improve outcomes of adults living with chronic conditions. Design: Review paper. Data sources: MEDLINE (Ovid), CINAHL, Academic Search Complete, PsychInfo and Scopus between 2000-2014. Review methods: Quantitative studies targeting patient outcomes through family-centred interventions in adults were retrieved using systematic methods in January, 2015. Search terms used were: 'family', 'spouse', 'carer', 'caregiver', 'chronic', 'chronic disease', 'self-care', 'self-management' and 'self-efficacy'. Reference lists were reviewed. Risk of bias assessment was performed using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool. Data were reported using a narrative summary approach. Results: Ten studies were identified. Improvements were noted in readmission rates, emergency department presentations, and anxiety levels using family-centred interventions compared with controls. Elements of effective interventions used were a family-centred approach, active learning strategy and transitional care with appropriate follow-up. Conclusions: Involving the family in self-care has shown some positive results for patients with chronic conditions. The benefits of family-centred care may be more likely in specific socio-cultural contexts. Limitations: The review has year limits and further research needs to identify support for both the patients and family caregivers.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)968-979
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Advanced Nursing
Volume72
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Chronic Disease
Self Care
Delivery of Health Care
Caregivers
Problem-Based Learning
Information Storage and Retrieval
Self Efficacy
Nuclear Family
MEDLINE
Hospital Emergency Service
Decision Making
Anxiety
Health
Research

Cite this

Deek, H., Hamilton, S., Brown, N., Inglis, S. C., Digiacomo, M., Newton, P. J., ... Davidson, P. M. (2016). Family-centred approaches to healthcare interventions in chronic diseases in adults: A quantitative systematic review. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 72(5), 968-979. https://doi.org/10.1111/jan.12885
Deek, H. ; Hamilton, Sandy ; Brown, N. ; Inglis, S.C. ; Digiacomo, M. ; Newton, P.J. ; Noureddine, S. ; Macdonald, P.S. ; Davidson, P.M. / Family-centred approaches to healthcare interventions in chronic diseases in adults: A quantitative systematic review. In: Journal of Advanced Nursing. 2016 ; Vol. 72, No. 5. pp. 968-979.
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Deek, H, Hamilton, S, Brown, N, Inglis, SC, Digiacomo, M, Newton, PJ, Noureddine, S, Macdonald, PS & Davidson, PM 2016, 'Family-centred approaches to healthcare interventions in chronic diseases in adults: A quantitative systematic review' Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol. 72, no. 5, pp. 968-979. https://doi.org/10.1111/jan.12885

Family-centred approaches to healthcare interventions in chronic diseases in adults: A quantitative systematic review. / Deek, H.; Hamilton, Sandy; Brown, N.; Inglis, S.C.; Digiacomo, M.; Newton, P.J.; Noureddine, S.; Macdonald, P.S.; Davidson, P.M.

In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, Vol. 72, No. 5, 2016, p. 968-979.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Family-centred approaches to healthcare interventions in chronic diseases in adults: A quantitative systematic review

AU - Deek, H.

AU - Hamilton, Sandy

AU - Brown, N.

AU - Inglis, S.C.

AU - Digiacomo, M.

AU - Newton, P.J.

AU - Noureddine, S.

AU - Macdonald, P.S.

AU - Davidson, P.M.

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Background: Increasingly there is a focus on self-care strategies for both malignant and non-malignant conditions. Models of self-care interventions have focussed on the individual and less on the broader context of family and society. In many societies, decision-making and health seeking behaviours, involve family members. Objective: To identify elements of effective family-centred self-care interventions that are likely to improve outcomes of adults living with chronic conditions. Design: Review paper. Data sources: MEDLINE (Ovid), CINAHL, Academic Search Complete, PsychInfo and Scopus between 2000-2014. Review methods: Quantitative studies targeting patient outcomes through family-centred interventions in adults were retrieved using systematic methods in January, 2015. Search terms used were: 'family', 'spouse', 'carer', 'caregiver', 'chronic', 'chronic disease', 'self-care', 'self-management' and 'self-efficacy'. Reference lists were reviewed. Risk of bias assessment was performed using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool. Data were reported using a narrative summary approach. Results: Ten studies were identified. Improvements were noted in readmission rates, emergency department presentations, and anxiety levels using family-centred interventions compared with controls. Elements of effective interventions used were a family-centred approach, active learning strategy and transitional care with appropriate follow-up. Conclusions: Involving the family in self-care has shown some positive results for patients with chronic conditions. The benefits of family-centred care may be more likely in specific socio-cultural contexts. Limitations: The review has year limits and further research needs to identify support for both the patients and family caregivers.

AB - © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Background: Increasingly there is a focus on self-care strategies for both malignant and non-malignant conditions. Models of self-care interventions have focussed on the individual and less on the broader context of family and society. In many societies, decision-making and health seeking behaviours, involve family members. Objective: To identify elements of effective family-centred self-care interventions that are likely to improve outcomes of adults living with chronic conditions. Design: Review paper. Data sources: MEDLINE (Ovid), CINAHL, Academic Search Complete, PsychInfo and Scopus between 2000-2014. Review methods: Quantitative studies targeting patient outcomes through family-centred interventions in adults were retrieved using systematic methods in January, 2015. Search terms used were: 'family', 'spouse', 'carer', 'caregiver', 'chronic', 'chronic disease', 'self-care', 'self-management' and 'self-efficacy'. Reference lists were reviewed. Risk of bias assessment was performed using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool. Data were reported using a narrative summary approach. Results: Ten studies were identified. Improvements were noted in readmission rates, emergency department presentations, and anxiety levels using family-centred interventions compared with controls. Elements of effective interventions used were a family-centred approach, active learning strategy and transitional care with appropriate follow-up. Conclusions: Involving the family in self-care has shown some positive results for patients with chronic conditions. The benefits of family-centred care may be more likely in specific socio-cultural contexts. Limitations: The review has year limits and further research needs to identify support for both the patients and family caregivers.

U2 - 10.1111/jan.12885

DO - 10.1111/jan.12885

M3 - Review article

VL - 72

SP - 968

EP - 979

JO - Journal of Advanced Nursing

JF - Journal of Advanced Nursing

SN - 0309-2402

IS - 5

ER -