Familial and non-familial risk factors associated with colorectal cancer survival in young and middle-aged patients

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Abstract

Background: Survival following colorectal cancer (CRC) survival may be influenced by a number of factors including family history, individual medical history, and comorbidities. The impact of these factors may vary based on the patient’s age. Methods: The study cohort consisted of individuals born in Western Australia between 1945 and 1996, who had been diagnosed with CRC prior to 2015 (n = 3220). Hospital, cancer, and mortality data were extracted for each patient from state health records and were used to identify potential risk factors associated with CRC survival. Family linkage data, in combination with cancer registry data, were used to identify first-degree family members with a history of CRC. The association between survival following CRC diagnosis and identified risk factors was examined using Cox proportional hazard models. Results: Age and sex were not significantly associated with survival in young patients. However, in middle-aged patients increasing age (HR 1.03, 95% CI 1.01–1.05, p = 0.003) and being male (HR 0.72, 95% CI 0.60–0.87, p < 0.001) were associated with reduced survival. Being diagnosed with polyps and having a colonoscopy prior to CRC diagnosis were associated with improved survival in both young and middle-aged patients, while a history of non-CRC and liver disease was associated with reduced survival. In middle-aged patients, having diabetes-related hospital admissions (HR 1.53, 95% CI 1.15–2.03, p = 0.004) was associated with reduced survival. Conclusions: In both young and middle-aged patients with CRC, factors associated with early screening and detection were associated with increased CRC survival while a history of liver disease and non-CRC was associated with decreased CRC survival.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1673-1680
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Colorectal Disease
Volume34
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2019

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Colorectal Neoplasms
Survival
Liver Neoplasms
Liver Diseases
Medical History Taking
Western Australia
Information Storage and Retrieval
Colonoscopy
Polyps
Hospital Mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Comorbidity
Cohort Studies
Health

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@article{d8df05130b1b48e7ba4887f5112db533,
title = "Familial and non-familial risk factors associated with colorectal cancer survival in young and middle-aged patients",
abstract = "Background: Survival following colorectal cancer (CRC) survival may be influenced by a number of factors including family history, individual medical history, and comorbidities. The impact of these factors may vary based on the patient’s age. Methods: The study cohort consisted of individuals born in Western Australia between 1945 and 1996, who had been diagnosed with CRC prior to 2015 (n = 3220). Hospital, cancer, and mortality data were extracted for each patient from state health records and were used to identify potential risk factors associated with CRC survival. Family linkage data, in combination with cancer registry data, were used to identify first-degree family members with a history of CRC. The association between survival following CRC diagnosis and identified risk factors was examined using Cox proportional hazard models. Results: Age and sex were not significantly associated with survival in young patients. However, in middle-aged patients increasing age (HR 1.03, 95{\%} CI 1.01–1.05, p = 0.003) and being male (HR 0.72, 95{\%} CI 0.60–0.87, p < 0.001) were associated with reduced survival. Being diagnosed with polyps and having a colonoscopy prior to CRC diagnosis were associated with improved survival in both young and middle-aged patients, while a history of non-CRC and liver disease was associated with reduced survival. In middle-aged patients, having diabetes-related hospital admissions (HR 1.53, 95{\%} CI 1.15–2.03, p = 0.004) was associated with reduced survival. Conclusions: In both young and middle-aged patients with CRC, factors associated with early screening and detection were associated with increased CRC survival while a history of liver disease and non-CRC was associated with decreased CRC survival.",
keywords = "Colorectal cancer, Family history, Middle-aged, Risk factors, Survival, Young",
author = "Erin Kelty and Ward, {Sarah V.} and Gemma Cadby and McCarthy, {Nina S.} and Peter O’Leary and Moses, {Eric K.} and Ee, {Hooi C.} and Preen, {David B.}",
year = "2019",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s00384-019-03380-5",
language = "English",
volume = "34",
pages = "1673--1680",
journal = "International Journal of Colorectal Disease",
issn = "0179-1958",
publisher = "Springer-Verlag London Ltd.",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Familial and non-familial risk factors associated with colorectal cancer survival in young and middle-aged patients

AU - Kelty, Erin

AU - Ward, Sarah V.

AU - Cadby, Gemma

AU - McCarthy, Nina S.

AU - O’Leary, Peter

AU - Moses, Eric K.

AU - Ee, Hooi C.

AU - Preen, David B.

PY - 2019/10/1

Y1 - 2019/10/1

N2 - Background: Survival following colorectal cancer (CRC) survival may be influenced by a number of factors including family history, individual medical history, and comorbidities. The impact of these factors may vary based on the patient’s age. Methods: The study cohort consisted of individuals born in Western Australia between 1945 and 1996, who had been diagnosed with CRC prior to 2015 (n = 3220). Hospital, cancer, and mortality data were extracted for each patient from state health records and were used to identify potential risk factors associated with CRC survival. Family linkage data, in combination with cancer registry data, were used to identify first-degree family members with a history of CRC. The association between survival following CRC diagnosis and identified risk factors was examined using Cox proportional hazard models. Results: Age and sex were not significantly associated with survival in young patients. However, in middle-aged patients increasing age (HR 1.03, 95% CI 1.01–1.05, p = 0.003) and being male (HR 0.72, 95% CI 0.60–0.87, p < 0.001) were associated with reduced survival. Being diagnosed with polyps and having a colonoscopy prior to CRC diagnosis were associated with improved survival in both young and middle-aged patients, while a history of non-CRC and liver disease was associated with reduced survival. In middle-aged patients, having diabetes-related hospital admissions (HR 1.53, 95% CI 1.15–2.03, p = 0.004) was associated with reduced survival. Conclusions: In both young and middle-aged patients with CRC, factors associated with early screening and detection were associated with increased CRC survival while a history of liver disease and non-CRC was associated with decreased CRC survival.

AB - Background: Survival following colorectal cancer (CRC) survival may be influenced by a number of factors including family history, individual medical history, and comorbidities. The impact of these factors may vary based on the patient’s age. Methods: The study cohort consisted of individuals born in Western Australia between 1945 and 1996, who had been diagnosed with CRC prior to 2015 (n = 3220). Hospital, cancer, and mortality data were extracted for each patient from state health records and were used to identify potential risk factors associated with CRC survival. Family linkage data, in combination with cancer registry data, were used to identify first-degree family members with a history of CRC. The association between survival following CRC diagnosis and identified risk factors was examined using Cox proportional hazard models. Results: Age and sex were not significantly associated with survival in young patients. However, in middle-aged patients increasing age (HR 1.03, 95% CI 1.01–1.05, p = 0.003) and being male (HR 0.72, 95% CI 0.60–0.87, p < 0.001) were associated with reduced survival. Being diagnosed with polyps and having a colonoscopy prior to CRC diagnosis were associated with improved survival in both young and middle-aged patients, while a history of non-CRC and liver disease was associated with reduced survival. In middle-aged patients, having diabetes-related hospital admissions (HR 1.53, 95% CI 1.15–2.03, p = 0.004) was associated with reduced survival. Conclusions: In both young and middle-aged patients with CRC, factors associated with early screening and detection were associated with increased CRC survival while a history of liver disease and non-CRC was associated with decreased CRC survival.

KW - Colorectal cancer

KW - Family history

KW - Middle-aged

KW - Risk factors

KW - Survival

KW - Young

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85071419527&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00384-019-03380-5

DO - 10.1007/s00384-019-03380-5

M3 - Article

VL - 34

SP - 1673

EP - 1680

JO - International Journal of Colorectal Disease

JF - International Journal of Colorectal Disease

SN - 0179-1958

IS - 10

ER -