Factors that improve negative symptoms in serious mental illness: longitudinal study in Perth, Western Australia

Maryam Habibi

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

A sample of 278 young people with serious mental illness was collected over three years to measure 1) appropriateness of Religious Coping and Insight as sub-scales of Resilience; and 2) effect of cognitive factors (Insight and Resilience) and community living factors (Employment, Income, Social-network and Living Situation) on Negative Symptoms and Subjective Quality or Ute (SQoL). Findings show that 1) neither Insight or Religious Coping contribute to the Resilience scale,and 2) accelerated Resilience, Insight, Employment and Social-network have a compounding effect on reducing Negative Symptoms improving SQoL. This research has both academic and practical implications in future policy formulation.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Award date31 Aug 2016
Publication statusUnpublished - 2016

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