Factors Predicting Secondary Respiratory Morbidity Following Early-Life Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections: Population-Based Cohort Study

Mohinder Sarna, Amanuel Gebremedhin, Peter C. Richmond, Kathryn Glass, Avram Levy, Hannah C. Moore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The association between early-life respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections and later respiratory morbidity is well established. However, there is limited evidence on factors that influence this risk. We examined sociodemographic and perinatal factors associated with later childhood respiratory morbidity requiring secondary care following exposure to a laboratory-confirmed RSV episode in the first 2 years. Methods: We used a probabilistically linked whole-of-population-based birth cohort including 252 287 children born in Western Australia between 2000 and 2009 with follow-up to the end of 2012. Cox proportional hazards models estimated adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) of the association of various risk factors with the first respiratory episode for asthma, wheezing, and unspecified acute lower respiratory infection beyond the age of 2 years. Results: The analytic cohort included 4151 children with a confirmed RSV test before age 2 years. The incidence of subsequent respiratory morbidity following early-life RSV infection decreased with child age at outcome (highest incidence in 2-<4-year-olds: 41.8 per 1000 child-years; 95% CI, 37.5-46.6), increased with age at RSV infection (6-<12-month-olds: 23.6/1000 child-years; 95% CI, 19.9-27.8; 12-<24-month-olds: 22.4/1000 child-years; 95% CI, 18.2-22.7) and decreasing gestational age (50.8/1000 child-years; 95% CI, 33.5-77.2 for children born extremely preterm, <28 weeks gestation). Risk factors included age at first RSV episode (6-<12 months: aHR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.06-1.90), extreme prematurity (<28 weeks: aHR, 2.22; 95% CI, 1.40-3.53), maternal history of asthma (aHR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.04-1.70), and low socioeconomic index (aHR, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.03-3.00). Conclusions: Our results suggest that in addition to preterm and young infants, children aged 12-<24 months could also be potential target groups for RSV prevention to reduce the burden of later respiratory morbidities associated with RSV.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberofad450
JournalOpen Forum Infectious Diseases
Volume10
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2023

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