Factors Influencing the Health Behaviour of Indigenous Australians: Perspectives from Support People

Philippa Waterworth, M. Pescud, Rebecca Braham, James Dimmock, Michael Rosenberg

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    6 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Disparities between the health of Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations continue to be prevalent within Australia. Research suggests that Indigenous people participate in health risk behaviour more often than their non-Indigenous counterparts, and that such behaviour has a substantial impact on health outcomes. Although this would indicate that reducing health risk behaviour may have positive effects on health outcomes, the factors that influence Indigenous health behaviour are still poorly understood. This study aimed to interview people who support Indigenous groups to gain an understanding of their views on the factors influencing health behaviour within Indigenous groups in Western Australia. Twenty nine people participated in the study. The emergent themes were mapped against the social ecological model. The results indicated that: (1) culture, social networks, history, racism, socioeconomic disadvantage, and the psychological distress associated with some of these factors interact to affect health behaviour in a complex manner; (2) the desire to retain cultural identity and distinctiveness may have both positive and negative influence on health risk behaviour; (3) strong social connections to family and kin that is intensified by cultural obligations, appears to affirm and disrupt positive health behaviour; (4) the separation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous social connection/networks that appeared to be fostered by marginalisation and racism may influence the effect of social networks on health behaviour; and (5) communication between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people may be interrupted by distrust between the groups, which reduces the influence of some non-Indigenous sources on the health behaviour of Indigenous people.
    Original languageEnglish
    Article numbere0142323
    Pages (from-to)1-17
    Number of pages17
    JournalPLoS One
    Volume10
    Issue number11
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 24 Nov 2015

    Fingerprint

    Health Behavior
    Health
    Risk-Taking
    Social Support
    Racism
    risk behavior
    social networks
    Health risks
    indigenous peoples
    Western Australia
    health behavior
    History
    Communication
    Interviews
    Psychology
    distress
    communication (human)
    socioeconomics
    interviews
    Research

    Cite this

    @article{41bed5423cf14f4b85e0353fa3cf9f82,
    title = "Factors Influencing the Health Behaviour of Indigenous Australians: Perspectives from Support People",
    abstract = "Disparities between the health of Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations continue to be prevalent within Australia. Research suggests that Indigenous people participate in health risk behaviour more often than their non-Indigenous counterparts, and that such behaviour has a substantial impact on health outcomes. Although this would indicate that reducing health risk behaviour may have positive effects on health outcomes, the factors that influence Indigenous health behaviour are still poorly understood. This study aimed to interview people who support Indigenous groups to gain an understanding of their views on the factors influencing health behaviour within Indigenous groups in Western Australia. Twenty nine people participated in the study. The emergent themes were mapped against the social ecological model. The results indicated that: (1) culture, social networks, history, racism, socioeconomic disadvantage, and the psychological distress associated with some of these factors interact to affect health behaviour in a complex manner; (2) the desire to retain cultural identity and distinctiveness may have both positive and negative influence on health risk behaviour; (3) strong social connections to family and kin that is intensified by cultural obligations, appears to affirm and disrupt positive health behaviour; (4) the separation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous social connection/networks that appeared to be fostered by marginalisation and racism may influence the effect of social networks on health behaviour; and (5) communication between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people may be interrupted by distrust between the groups, which reduces the influence of some non-Indigenous sources on the health behaviour of Indigenous people.",
    author = "Philippa Waterworth and M. Pescud and Rebecca Braham and James Dimmock and Michael Rosenberg",
    year = "2015",
    month = "11",
    day = "24",
    doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0142323",
    language = "English",
    volume = "10",
    pages = "1--17",
    journal = "P L o S One",
    issn = "1932-6203",
    publisher = "Public Library of Science (PLoS)",
    number = "11",

    }

    Factors Influencing the Health Behaviour of Indigenous Australians: Perspectives from Support People. / Waterworth, Philippa; Pescud, M.; Braham, Rebecca; Dimmock, James; Rosenberg, Michael.

    In: PLoS One, Vol. 10, No. 11, e0142323, 24.11.2015, p. 1-17.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Factors Influencing the Health Behaviour of Indigenous Australians: Perspectives from Support People

    AU - Waterworth, Philippa

    AU - Pescud, M.

    AU - Braham, Rebecca

    AU - Dimmock, James

    AU - Rosenberg, Michael

    PY - 2015/11/24

    Y1 - 2015/11/24

    N2 - Disparities between the health of Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations continue to be prevalent within Australia. Research suggests that Indigenous people participate in health risk behaviour more often than their non-Indigenous counterparts, and that such behaviour has a substantial impact on health outcomes. Although this would indicate that reducing health risk behaviour may have positive effects on health outcomes, the factors that influence Indigenous health behaviour are still poorly understood. This study aimed to interview people who support Indigenous groups to gain an understanding of their views on the factors influencing health behaviour within Indigenous groups in Western Australia. Twenty nine people participated in the study. The emergent themes were mapped against the social ecological model. The results indicated that: (1) culture, social networks, history, racism, socioeconomic disadvantage, and the psychological distress associated with some of these factors interact to affect health behaviour in a complex manner; (2) the desire to retain cultural identity and distinctiveness may have both positive and negative influence on health risk behaviour; (3) strong social connections to family and kin that is intensified by cultural obligations, appears to affirm and disrupt positive health behaviour; (4) the separation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous social connection/networks that appeared to be fostered by marginalisation and racism may influence the effect of social networks on health behaviour; and (5) communication between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people may be interrupted by distrust between the groups, which reduces the influence of some non-Indigenous sources on the health behaviour of Indigenous people.

    AB - Disparities between the health of Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations continue to be prevalent within Australia. Research suggests that Indigenous people participate in health risk behaviour more often than their non-Indigenous counterparts, and that such behaviour has a substantial impact on health outcomes. Although this would indicate that reducing health risk behaviour may have positive effects on health outcomes, the factors that influence Indigenous health behaviour are still poorly understood. This study aimed to interview people who support Indigenous groups to gain an understanding of their views on the factors influencing health behaviour within Indigenous groups in Western Australia. Twenty nine people participated in the study. The emergent themes were mapped against the social ecological model. The results indicated that: (1) culture, social networks, history, racism, socioeconomic disadvantage, and the psychological distress associated with some of these factors interact to affect health behaviour in a complex manner; (2) the desire to retain cultural identity and distinctiveness may have both positive and negative influence on health risk behaviour; (3) strong social connections to family and kin that is intensified by cultural obligations, appears to affirm and disrupt positive health behaviour; (4) the separation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous social connection/networks that appeared to be fostered by marginalisation and racism may influence the effect of social networks on health behaviour; and (5) communication between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people may be interrupted by distrust between the groups, which reduces the influence of some non-Indigenous sources on the health behaviour of Indigenous people.

    U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0142323

    DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0142323

    M3 - Article

    VL - 10

    SP - 1

    EP - 17

    JO - P L o S One

    JF - P L o S One

    SN - 1932-6203

    IS - 11

    M1 - e0142323

    ER -