Factors associated with high consumption of soft drinks among Australian secondary-school students

Maree Scully, Belinda Morley, Philippa Niven, David Crawford, Iain S Pratt, Melanie A. Wakefield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To examine demographic and behavioural correlates of high consumption of soft drinks (non-alcoholic sugar-sweetened carbonated drinks excluding energy drinks) among Australian adolescents and to explore the associations between high consumption and soft drink perceptions and accessibility. Design Cross-sectional self-completion survey and height and weight measurements. Setting Australian secondary schools. Subjects Students aged 12-17 years participating in the 2012-13 National Secondary Students' Diet and Activity (NaSSDA) survey (n 7835). Results Overall, 14 % of students reported consuming four or more cups (≥1 litres) of soft drinks each week ('high soft drink consumers'). Demographic factors associated with high soft drink consumption were being male and having at least $AU 40 in weekly spending money. Behavioural factors associated with high soft drink consumption were low fruit intake, consuming energy drinks on a weekly basis, eating fast foods at least once weekly, eating snack foods ≥14 times/week, watching television for >2 h/d and sleeping for
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2340-2348
Number of pages9
JournalPublic Health Nutrition
Volume20
Issue number13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sept 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Factors associated with high consumption of soft drinks among Australian secondary-school students'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this