Expression profiling identifies altered expression of genes that contribute to the inhibition of transforming growth factor-β signaling in ovarian cancer

Jan S. Sunde, Howard Donninger, Kongming Wu, Michael E. Johnson, Richard G. Pestell, G. Scott Rose, Samuel C. Mok, John Brady, Tomas Bonome, Michael J. Birrer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

86 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ovarian cancer is resistant to the antiproliferative effects of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β); however, the mechanism of this resistance remains unclear. We used oligonucleotide arrays to profile 37 undissected, 68 microdissected advanced-stage, and 14 microdissected early-stage papillary serous cancers to identify signaling pathways involved in ovarian cancer. A total of seven genes involved in TGF-β signaling were identified that had altered expression > 1.5-fold (P < 0.001) in the ovarian cancer specimens compared with normal ovarian surface epithelium. The expression of these genes was coordinately altered: genes that inhibit TGF-β signaling (DACH1, BMP7, and EVI1) were up-regulated in advanced-stage ovarian cancers and, conversely, genes that enhance TGF-β signaling (PCAF, TFE3, TGFBRII, and SMAD4) were down-regulated compared with the normal samples. The microarray data for DACH1 and EVI1 were validated using quantitative real-tune PCR on 11 microdissected ovarian cancer specimens. The EVI1 gene locus was amplified in 43% of the tumors, and there was a significant correlation (P = 0.029) between gene copy number and EVI1 gene expression. No amplification at the DACH1 locus was found in any of the samples. DACH1 and EVI1 inhibited TGF-β signaling in immortalized normal ovarian epithelial cells, and a dominant-negative DACH1, DACH1-ΔDS, partially restored signaling in an ovarian cancer cell line resistant to TGF-β. These results suggest that altered expression of these genes is responsible for disrupted TGF-β signaling in ovarian cancer and they may be useful as new and novel therapeutic targets for ovarian cancer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)8404-8412
Number of pages9
JournalCancer Research
Volume66
Issue number17
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sept 2006
Externally publishedYes

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